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Home >> excel 2007 >> Excel 2007 - Workbook management

This page presents how to work with Microsoft Excel 2007 features and its redesigned interface. You may also visit our Excel Question page.

 

    File recovery

      Repairing a corrupted workbook

    File management

      Create a new workbook

      Enable support for other file formats, such as PDF and XPS

      How daylight saving time (DST) changes in 2007 affect time stamps in Office files

      Change the default file format for saving workbooks

      Make changes to a PDF file

      Save a file

      Introduction to new file name extensions and Open XML Formats

      Organize quick file access by using the My Places bar

      Select multiple files

      Close workbooks or workbook windows

      Repairing a corrupted workbook

      Save workbooks in an arranged workspace

      Automatically save a backup copy of a workbook

      Save a file in PDF format

      Save a file in XPS format

      Naming files and attachments

      Why do you check to see if my software is genuine when I download a template?

      Open a file

      Copy a file

      Rename a file

      Move a file

      Delete a file

      View or change the properties for an Office document

      Create a connection to a shared network folder

      Set or rename a default working folder

      Create a new folder

      Customize the list of recently used files

      Go back to the previous folder, drive, or Internet location

    Templates and forms

      Create and use an Excel template


Repairing a corrupted workbook

When you open a workbook that has been corrupted, Microsoft Office Excel automatically starts File Recovery mode and attempts to reopen and simultaneously repair the workbook.

Excel cannot always start File Recovery mode automatically. If you cannot open a workbook because it has been corrupted, you can try to repair the workbook manually.

You can also try other methods to recover workbook data when repairing a workbook is not successful. As a preventive measure, you may want to save your workbook often and create a backup copy every time that you save it. Or you can specify that Excel automatically creates a recovery file at specific intervals. This way, you will have access to a good copy of the workbook, if the original is deleted accidentally or if it becomes corrupted.

What do you want to do?

Repair a corrupted workbook manually

Recover data from a corrupted workbook

Automatically save a backup copy of a workbook

Automatically create a recovery file at specific intervals

Repair a corrupted workbook manually

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.
  2. In the Open dialog box, select the corrupted workbook that you want to open.
  3. Click the arrow next to the Open button, and then click Open and Repair.
  4. Do one of the following:
    • To recover as much of the workbook data as possible, click Repair.
    • To extract values and formulas from the workbook when an attempt to repair the workbook is not successful, click Extract Data.

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Recover data from a corrupted workbook

The following methods may help you to salvage data that might otherwise be lost. If one method is not successful, you can try another. You can also try third-party software solutions to try to recover workbook data if you cannot recover your data by using these methods.

Important  If a disk error or network error makes it impossible to open a workbook, move the workbook to a different hard disk drive or from the network to a local disk before you spend time trying any of the following recovery options.

  • To recover data when the workbook is open in Excel, do one of the following:
    • Revert the workbook to the last saved version   If you are editing a worksheet and the workbook becomes corrupted before you save your changes, you can recover the original worksheet by reverting it to the last saved version.

To revert the workbook to the last saved version, do the following:

      1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.
      2. Double-click the name of the workbook that you have open in Excel.
      3. Click Yes to reopen the workbook.

 Note    The workbook reverts to the last saved version of the workbook. Any changes that may have caused the workbook to become corrupted have been discarded.

    • Save the workbook in SYLK (Symbolic Link) format   By saving the workbook in SYLK format, you may be able to filter out the corrupted elements. SYLK format is typically used to remove printer corruption.

To save the workbook in SYLK format, do the following:

      1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then point to the arrow next to Save As.
      2. In the Save as type list, click SYLK (Symbolic Link), and then click Save.

 Note    Only the active sheet in the workbook is saved when you use the SYLK file format.

      1. If a message prompts you that the selected file type does not support workbooks that contain multiple sheets, click OK to save only the active sheet.
      2. If a message prompts you that the workbook may contain features that are not compatible with the SYLK format, click Yes.
      3. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Close.
      4. If a message prompts you to save the changes that you made, click Yes.
      5. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.
      6. Select the .slk file that you saved, and then click Open.

 Note    To see the .slk file, you may need to click All Files or SYLK Files in the Files of type list.

      1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then point to the arrow next to Save As.
      2. In the Save as type box, click Excel Workbook.
      3. In the File name box, type a new name for the workbook to create a copy without replacing the original workbook, and then click Save.

 Note    Because this format saves only the active worksheet in the workbook, you must open the corrupted workbook repeatedly and save each worksheet separately.

  • To recover the data when you cannot open the workbook in Excel, do one of the following:
    • Set the calculation option in Excel to manual   To open a workbook, try changing the calculation setting from automatic to manual. Because the workbook won't be recalculated, it may open.

To set the calculation option in Excel to manual, do the following:

      1. Make sure that a new, blank workbook is open in Excel. If a new, blank workbook is not open, do the following:
        1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click New.
        2. Under New Blank, click Blank document.
      2. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Excel Options.
      3. In the Formulas category, under Calculation options, click Manually.
      4. Click OK.
      5. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.
      6. Select the corrupted workbook, and then click Open.
    • Use external references to link to the corrupted workbook   If you want to retrieve only data and not formulas or values from the workbook, you can use external references to link to the corrupted workbook.

To use external references to link to the corrupted workbook, do the following:

      1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.
      2. In the Look in box, select the folder that contains the corrupted workbook, and then click Cancel.
      3. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click New.
      4. Under New Blank, click Blank document.
      5. In cell A1 of the new workbook, type =File Name!A1, where File Name is the name of the corrupted workbook, and then press ENTER.

Tip  You have to enter only the name of the workbook  you do not have to type the extension.

      1. Click the workbook, and then click OK.
      2. If the Select Sheet dialog box appears, select the appropriate sheet, and then click OK.
      3. Select cell A1.
      4. On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click Copy.

Keyboard shortcut  You can also press CTRL+C.

      1. Select an area that is approximately the same size as the range of cells that contain data in the corrupted workbook.
      2. On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click Paste.

Keyboard shortcut  You can also press CTRL+V.

      1. With the range of cells still selected, on the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click Copy again.

Keyboard shortcut  You can also press CTRL+C.

      1. On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the arrow below Paste, and then click Paste Special.
      2. Under Paste, select Values, and then click OK.

 Note    Pasting values removes the links to the corrupted workbook and leaves only the data.

    • Open the corrupted workbook in Microsoft Office Word or Microsoft WordPad   If you have the Microsoft Office Excel converter installed, you might be able to open the workbook in Word. If the workbook opens in Word, you can recover the data. You cannot use this method to recover module sheets, dialog sheets, chart sheets, macro sheets, or any embedded charts. You won't be able to recover cell formulas either. You can recover only the results of those formulas that are currently displayed in the cells of the corrupted workbook.

You can also open your Excel workbook in WordPad. If the workbook does open, you may be able to recover the Microsoft Visual Basic code in your modules and class modules. You can search for the words "Sub" or "Function" to find your code.

    • Use a macro to extract data from a corrupted workbook   If a chart is linked to the corrupted workbook, you can use a macro to extract the source data of the chart.

To use a macro, do the following:

      1. Enter the following macro code in a module sheet:
      2.  
      3. Sub GetChartValues97()
      4. Dim NumberOfRows As Integer
      5. Dim X As Object
      6. Counter = 2
      7.  
      8. ' Calculate the number of rows of data.
      9. NumberOfRows = UBound(ActiveChart.SeriesCollection(1).Values)
      10.  
      11. Worksheets("ChartData").Cells(1, 1) = "X Values"
      12.  
      13. ' Write x-axis values to worksheet.
      14. With Worksheets("ChartData")
      15. .Range(.Cells(2, 1), _
      16. .Cells(NumberOfRows + 1, 1)) = _
      17. Application.Transpose(ActiveChart.SeriesCollection(1).XValues)
      18. End With
      19.  
      20. ' Loop through all series in the chart and write their values to
      21.  
      22.  
      23. ' the worksheet.
      24. For Each X In ActiveChart.SeriesCollection
      25. Worksheets("ChartData").Cells(1, Counter) = X.Name
      26.  
      27. With Worksheets("ChartData")
      28. .Range(.Cells(2, Counter), _
      29. .Cells(NumberOfRows + 1, Counter)) = _
      30. Application.Transpose(X.Values)
      31. End With
      32.  
      33. Counter = Counter + 1
      34. Next
      35.  
      36. End Sub
      37. Insert a new worksheet into your workbook and rename it ChartData.
      38. Select the chart from which you want to extract the underlying data values.

 Note    The chart can be embedded on a worksheet or on a separate chart sheet.

      1. Run the GetChartValues97 macro.

The data from the chart will be placed on the ChartData worksheet.

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Automatically save a backup copy of a workbook

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then point to the arrow next to Save As.
  2. Click the arrow next to Tools, and then click General Options.
  3. Select the Always create backup check box.

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Automatically create a recovery file at specific intervals

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Excel Options.
  2. In the Save category, under Preserve backup information for your workbooks, select the Save AutoRecover information every check box, and then enter a number of minutes.
  3. In the AutoRecover file location box, enter the location where you want to save the recovery file.
  4. Make sure that the Disable AutoRecover for this workbook only check box is not selected.

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Excel > Workbook management > File management

Create a new workbook

A Microsoft Office Excel workbook is a file that contains one or more worksheets (worksheet: The primary document that you use in Excel to store and work with data. Also called a spreadsheet. A worksheet consists of cells that are organized into columns and rows; a worksheet is always stored in a workbook.) that you can use to organize various kinds of related information. To create a new workbook, you can open a blank workbook. You can also base a new workbook on an existing workbook, the default workbook template (default workbook template: The Book.xlt template that you create to change the default format of new workbooks. Excel uses the template to create a blank workbook when you start Excel or create a new workbook without specifying a template.), or any other template (template: A workbook that you create and use as the basis for other similar workbooks. You can create templates for workbooks and worksheets. The default template for workbooks is called Book.xlt. The default template for worksheets is called Sheet.xlt.).

What do you want to do?

Open a new, blank workbook

Base a new workbook on an existing workbook

Base a new workbook on a template

Open a new, blank workbook

  1. Click Microsoft Office Button , and then click New.
  2. Under Templates, make sure that Blank and recent is selected, and then under Blank and recent in the right pane, double-click Blank Workbook.

Keyboard shortcut  To quickly create a new, blank workbook, you can also press CTRL+N.

Tips

  • By default, a new workbook contains three worksheets, but you can change the number of worksheets that you want a new workbook to contain under When creating new workbooks on the Popular tab in the Excel Options dialog box (Microsoft Office Button , Excel Options button).
  • You can also add and remove worksheets as needed.

For more information about how to add or remove worksheets, see Insert or delete a worksheet.

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Base a new workbook on an existing workbook

  1. Click Microsoft Office Button , and then click New.
  2. Under Templates, click New from existing.
  3. In the New from Existing Workbook dialog box, browse to the drive, folder, or Internet location that contains the workbook that you want to open.
  4. Click the workbook, and then click Create New.

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Base a new workbook on a template

  1. Click Microsoft Office Button , and then click New.
  2. Under Templates, click Installed Templates or My templates.
  3. Do one of the following:
    • To use an installed template, under Installed Templates, click the template that you want, and then click Create.
    • To use your own template, on the My Templates tab, double-click the template that you want.

 Note    The My Templates tab lists the templates that you have created. If you do not see the template that you want to use, make sure that it is located in the correct folder. Custom templates are typically stored in the Templates folder, which is usually C:\Users\user_name\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Templates in Windows Vista, and C:\Documents and Settings\user_name\Application Data\Microsoft\Templates in Microsoft Windows XP.

Tips

  • To obtain more workbook templates, you can download them from Microsoft Office Online. In the New Workbook dialog box, under Microsoft Office Online, click a specific template category, click the template that you want to download, and then click Download.
  • For more information about how to create your own templates, see Create and use an Excel template.

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See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Enable support for other file formats, such as PDF and XPS

Tags  .pdf; .pdf add-in; add-in; convert; export; file format; insert pdf; save as; XPS

What are tags?

There are many situations where it is useful to save your file in a fixed-layout format that is easy to share and print and hard to modify. Examples of these situations include resumes, legal documents, newsletters, and any other file that is intended to be primarily read and printed. The 2007 Microsoft Office system offers a free add-in to save or export this type of file, but you must first install the add-in before you can use it. Other third-party products may also be available to export a Microsoft Office file into a fixed-layout document.

What do you want to do?

Learn about PDF and XPS file formats

Install and use the Save as PDF or XPS add-in from Microsoft

Install a third-party solution

Learn about PDF and XPS file formats

By using an add-in, you can save or export a file from your Microsoft Office program into the following formats:

  • Portable Document Format (PDF)   PDF is a fixed-layout electronic file format that preserves document formatting and enables file sharing. The PDF format ensures that when the file is viewed online or printed, it retains exactly the format that you intended, and that data in the file cannot be easily changed. The PDF format is also useful for documents that will be reproduced by using commercial printing methods.
  • XML Paper Specification (XPS)   XPS is a fixed-layout electronic file format that preserves document formatting and enables file sharing. The XPS format ensures that when the file is viewed online or printed, it retains exactly the format that you intended, and that data in the file cannot be easily changed.

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Install and use the Save as PDF or XPS add-in from Microsoft

To save or export a file to PDF or XPS, you must first install the Save as PDF or XPS add-in for the 2007 Microsoft Office system.

  1. Go to the Microsoft Save as PDF or XPS Add-in for 2007 Microsoft Office programs and follow the instructions on that page.
  2. After you install the Save as PDF or XPS add-in, you can export your file to PDF or XPS. Find links to more information about how to do this in the See Also section.

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Install a third-party solution

There may be other solutions available to save or export data from your Microsoft Office program into another format.

  1. Visit Microsoft Office Marketplace and browse or search for an add-in.
  2. After you obtain the add-in, follow the vendor's instructions on installing and using the add-in.

 Note    The third-party products discussed in this article are manufactured by vendors independent of Microsoft; Microsoft makes no warranty, implied or otherwise, regarding the performance or reliability of these products.

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See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

How daylight saving time (DST) changes in 2007 affect time stamps in Office files

This information applies to people who live in the areas of the United States and Canada that observe daylight saving time (DST) and who require that accurate time is recorded when their Microsoft Office 2003 and 2007 Microsoft Office system documents are saved or modified. For example, changes to a document might need to be time stamped for legal purposes. This information might also apply to people in other countries and territories that observe "summer time," during which clocks are adjusted forward one hour in early spring and adjusted backward in autumn.

In this article

Downloads and support information

Background information

How the change in DST in 2007 might affect your Office files

Frequently asked questions

Downloads and support information

For information about the latest Windows time zone update and to download and install the latest cumulative update, see KB 933360: August 2007 cumulative time zone update for Microsoft Windows operating systems

 Note    If you use Windows Vista or have signed up for Microsoft Update to receive updates automatically, you may not be affected by the change in daylight saving time. If you want to confirm that your computer is not affected by the Windows time zone update, visit the Daylight Saving Time Help and Support Center and follow the steps in the Daylight Saving Time Update Guide.

For more information about how DST changes may affect other Microsoft products, visit the Daylight Saving Time Help and Support Center.

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Background information

In August 2005, the United States Congress passed the Energy Policy Act, which changes the start date and end date of DST as observed in the United States. Some additional countries/regions are following the U.S. change. As such, in 2007, DST starts on March 11, 2007, and ends on November 4, 2007  resulting in a new DST period that is four weeks longer than previously observed. These dates are referred to in this article as the extended DST period.

Daylight saving time rules

1987 to 2006   DST began (shifted the time one hour forward) at 2 A.M. on the first Sunday in April and ended (shifted the time one hour back) at 2 A.M. on the last Sunday in October.

Starting in 2007   DST begins at 2 A.M. on the second Sunday in March (three or four weeks earlier than previously observed, depending on the year) and ends at 2 A.M. on the first Sunday in November (one week later than previously observed).

  • In 2007, DST is observed from March 11 through November 4, in areas of the United States and Canada that observe DST.

Updates to Microsoft Windows

New DST definitions are built into Windows Vista. However, earlier versions of the Microsoft Windows operating system need an update to accommodate the early end to standard time. This single update is global and includes changes for the United States and Canada. The update affects the following products:

  • Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2)
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2 (SP2)
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1 (SP1)
  • Windows Embedded for Point of Service
  • Windows Fundamentals for Legacy PCs

This time zone update also includes changes for other related DST changes and time zone behavior and settings that start in 2007 or have taken place since these versions of Windows were originally released. For more information on supporting the DST changes in Windows operating systems, see KB 933360: August 2007 cumulative time zone update for Microsoft Windows operating systems

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How the change in DST in 2007 might affect your Office files

Upcoming changes to DST might affect the time stamps on the file properties and tracked changes in Microsoft Office programs, such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Project.

The new DST dates might affect the time or date (if revised within an hour of 12:00 midnight) that is stamped in items that are created or modified during the extended-DST periods or previous extended-DST periods in the following items.

Time stamped item

Description

"Date modified" in file properties

Date and time a document was last saved

Tracked changes in Word and Excel

Date and time a revision was made

Tracked changes in PowerPoint

Date and time a comment was inserted

Time functions

Functions based on time such as TODAY() in Excel

"Date created" and "Date modified" in a file's properties

Files that are created after you or your IT administrator apply the Windows time zone update display the correct date-created and date-modified time in the file's properties. To view the properties, in Windows Explorer, go to the document location, such as My Documents. Right-click the document icon, and then click Properties. If you signed up to get updates from Microsoft Update or Windows Update, you might have received the DST update automatically. For more information, see Microsoft Update. However, documents with time stamps in previous extended-DST periods (for example, between March 12, 2006 and April 2, 2006, as well as the week between October 29, 2006 and November 5, 2006) are also shifted by one hour.

Here is an example to show the impact on time stamps for a document that you created on March 20, 2006, and saved at 7:28 P.M. in a U.S. time zone that observes daylight saving time (see Figure 1).

Fig. 1  Before the Windows time zone update was applied.

After you apply the Windows update for DST 2007, the file that was created last year displays the incorrect time stamp in its date-created and date-modified properties of 8:28 P.M. (see Figure 2).

Fig. 2  After the Windows time zone update was applied.

Files that you create after applying the Windows operating system update for DST 2007 correctly display the time stamps. If you do not apply the Windows time zone update, the date-modified property of the document created in 2007 is not shifted during the new DST period and incorrectly displays 6:28 P.M. However, the displayed times of the document created in 2006 are not shifted either and display the correct time stamp of 7:28 P.M.

Document created on March 20  

 

Current year 2007

Previous year - 2006

DST update applied

Correct 7:28 P.M.

Incorrect 8:28 P.M.

DST update not applied

Incorrect 6:28 P.M.

Correct 7:28 P.M.

Tracked changes and time functions

Time stamps in tracked changes and inserted comments in Microsoft Office Word, Microsoft Office Excel, and Microsoft Office PowerPoint are recorded based on your system clock in the Windows operating system.

  • To view the system clock in Category view, click Start, click Control Panel, click Date, Time, Language, and Regional Options, and then click Date and Time.
  • To view the system clock in Classic view, click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Date and Time.

When you apply the Windows time zone update, these time stamps display the correct time for items that are modified during the extended DST period. Additionally, no changes are made retroactively. Therefore, time stamps in previous extended-DST periods also are displayed correctly.

Time functions, such as TODAY() in Excel, are also based on the system clock in the Windows operating system.

Function

Behavior

When Windows is updated

Tracked changes in Microsoft Office Word

Each tracked change is stamped with the current date and time.

New comments correctly reflect the updated system time. Previous time stamps are not changed retroactively.

Tracked changes in Microsoft Office Excel

Each tracked change is stamped with the current date and time.

New comments correctly reflect the updated system time. Previous time stamps are not changed retroactively.

Time functions in Excel

Functions such as TODAY() and NOW() use the system clock in the Windows operating system to determine the current date and time.

When a change is made to the system clock, whether it is a change to the time zone or a change to or from daylight saving time, the function returns a value that is consistent with the updated system clock the next time it is recalculated.

Inserted comments in Microsoft Office PowerPoint

PowerPoint does not have the full tracked changes functionality that exists in Word. Instead, PowerPoint stamps inserted comments with the current date.

As with Word and Excel, new comments correctly reflect the updated system time. Previous time stamps are not changed retroactively.

E-mail items in Microsoft Office Outlook

Every e-mail message is stamped with the time and date it was sent, based on the sender's system clock. Every message is also stamped with the time and date it was received, based on the receiver's system clock. For more detail about how meetings and appointments are affected in Outlook, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 931667: Addressing daylight saving time using the Time Zone Data Update Tool for Microsoft Office Outlook.

Time stamps are not retroactively updated to reflect changes in the system time on either the sender's or receiver's computer.

Tasks in Microsoft Office Project

Tasks in Project are not linked dynamically to the system clock.

The project schedule does not retroactively update to reflect changes in the system time.

Time functions in Project

Functions such as NOW() and HOUR() use the system clock to determine the current time. When a change is made to the system clock, the function returns a value consistent with the updated date and time.

When a change is made to the system clock, whether it is a change to the time zone or a change to or from daylight saving time, the function returns a value consistent with the updated system clock the next time it is recalculated. Time stamps are not retroactively updated to reflect changes in the system time.

Scheduler service reminders in Project

The time when reminders are sent is based on the system clock.

When a change is made to the system clock, whether it is a change to the time zone or a change to or from daylight saving time, reminders are sent based on the updated system clock.

Project creation date and check-out time stamps in Project

Project creation and check-out times are based on the system clock.

When a change is made to the system clock, whether it is a change to the time zone or a change to or from daylight saving time, creation and check-out time stamps reflect the time of the updated system clock. Time stamps are not retroactively updated.

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Frequently asked questions

Will documents created or modified in previous years during the extended-DST periods display the incorrect time property after the Windows operating system update for DST 2007 is applied?  

Yes, the times in the document's Properties will be off by one hour during extended-DST periods for 2006 and earlier, after the Windows operating system DST 2007 update has been applied. Previous extended-DST periods in the United States (prior to 2007) are those dates between the second Sunday in March and the first Sunday in April (for example, March 12, 2006, to April 2, 2006) as well as the week between the last Sunday in October and the first Sunday in November (for example, October 29, 2006, and November 5, 2006). Also, programs that display the time dynamically by referencing the system clock might also display these historical time stamps incorrectly  check with your software provider for more details.

  • To view the system clock in Category view, click Start, click Control Panel, click Date, Time, Language, and Regional Options, and then click Date and Time.
  • To view the system clock in Classic view, click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Date and Time.

Why are some time stamps and time references that are displayed in document properties affected by the DST shift?  

Programs that handle time stamps typically store those time stamps in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The advantage of UTC is that it is universal and invariant; it is not subject to local time zones or daylight saving time (DST). However, UTC does not display time in a format that is meaningful to most users, so computers convert UTC time to local time based on two factors: first, the time zone designated by the user, and second, whether DST is selected in the Date and Time item in Control Panel. The change in DST does not affect the historical time stamps as recorded in UTC, but the change might affect how time stamps are interpreted (and therefore displayed) by the Windows operating system and certain programs.

Should I apply the Windows time zone update?  

In general, computer systems should be updated to reflect the new DST rules. For most users, this means that you or your IT administrator should apply software updates to select Microsoft products, including various releases of Windows operating systems, servers, applications, and components.

Is there a fix available so that the date-modified time for the properties of documents that were created in previous extended-DST periods does not shift?  

Not currently. However, Microsoft is investigating the key requirements and development impact for this issue.

For more information, visit the Daylight Saving Time Help and Support Center.

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Excel > Workbook management > File management

Change the default file format for saving workbooks

In Microsoft Office Excel 2007, workbooks (workbook: A spreadsheet program file that you create in Excel. A workbook contains worksheets of rows and columns in which you can enter and calculate data.) are saved as Excel Workbooks (.xlsx) by default. You can change the default file format to any other file format that is supported in Office Excel 2007. For example, if you frequently create macros in a workbook, you may want to automatically save a new workbook as an Excel Macro-Enabled Workbook (.xlsm). Or, if you work with others who use earlier versions of Microsoft Excel, you may want to save a new workbook as an Excel 97-2003 Workbook (.xls).

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Excel Options.
  2. In the Save category, under Save Workbooks, in the Save files in this format list, click the file format that you want to use.

Tip  For more information, see File formats that are supported in Excel.

 Notes 

  • After you specify the default file format, all new workbooks are saved in the selected file format unless you specify a different format in the Save As dialog box when you save a workbook.
  • Some features and formatting might not be available if you save the workbook in the file format of an earlier version of Microsoft Excel or another spreadsheet program.

For more information, see Excel formatting and features that are not transferred to other file formats.

 

See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Make changes to a PDF file

You can save files created by many 2007 Microsoft Office system programs in Portable Document Format (PDF), which is a common format for sharing documents, if you have installed the free PDF add-in. To learn more about the free PDF add-in for the 2007 Office release, see Enable support for other file formats, such as PDF and XPS.

To change the PDF file, do one of the following:

 

 

Excel > Saving and printing

Save a file

Tags  default; file format; file name; files; save; save as; save as template; save document

What are tags?

When you save a file, you can save it to a folder on your hard disk drive, a network location, disk, DVD, CD, the desktop, flash drive, or another storage location. You must identify the target location in the Save in list. Otherwise, the saving process is the same, regardless of what location you choose.

You should save the file frequently while you are working on it to avoid losing data because of an unexpected power failure or other problem.

What do you want to do?

Save a file

Save a copy of a file (Save As command)

Save a file to another format (Save As command)

Save AutoRecover information automatically

Save a file

By default, the Microsoft Office programs save a file in a default working folder. If you want, you can specify a different location.

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save.

Important  If you don't see the Microsoft Office Button , click Save on the File menu.

Keyboard shortcut  To save the file, press CTRL+S.

  1. If you are saving the file for the first time, you are asked to give it a name.

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Save a copy of a file (Save As command)

You can also use the Save As command to rename a file or change the location of where you save the file.

Save As dialog box in Windows Vista

Save As dialog box in Microsoft Windows XP

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.

Important  If you don't see the Microsoft Office Button , click Save As on the File menu.

Keyboard shortcut  To open the Save As dialog box, press ALT, F, A.

  1. In the File name box, enter a new name for the file.
  2. Click Save.

Tip  To save the copy in a different folder, click a different drive in the Save in list or a different folder in the folder list. To save the copy in a new folder, click Create New Folder .

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Save a file to another format (Save As command)

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.

Important  If you don't see the Microsoft Office Button , click Save As on the File menu.

Keyboard shortcut  To open the Save As dialog box, press ALT, F, A.

  1. In the File name box, enter a new name for the file.
  2. In the Save as type list, click the file format that you want to save the file in. For example, click Rich Text Format (.rtf), Web Page (1033.aspx or 1033.aspxl), or Comma Delimited (.csv).
  3. Click Save.

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Save AutoRecover information automatically

AutoRecover does not replace regularly saving your files. If you choose not to save the recovery file after you open it, the file is deleted, and your unsaved changes are lost. If you save the recovery file, it replaces the original file (unless you specify a new file name). The more frequently your files are saved, the more information is recovered if there is a power failure or other problem while a file is open.

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Excel

InfoPath

PowerPoint

Project

Publisher

Visio

Word

Excel

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Excel Options.
  2. Click Save.
  3. Select the Save AutoRecover information every check box.
  4. In the minutes box, type or select a number to determine how often you want to save files.

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InfoPath

  1. On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the Advanced tab.
  2. Select the When filling out forms, save AutoRecover information every check box.
  3. In the minutes box, type or select a number to determine how often you want to save files.

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PowerPoint

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click PowerPoint Options.
  2. Click Save.
  3. Select the Save AutoRecover information every check box.
  4. In the minutes box, type or select a number to determine how often you want to save files.

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Project

  1. On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the Advanced tab.
  2. Select the Save every check box.
  3. In the minutes box, type or select a number to determine how often you want to save files.

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Publisher

  1. On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the Advanced tab.
  2. Select the Save AutoRecover info every check box.
  3. In the minutes box, type or select a number to determine how often you want to save files.

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Visio

  1. On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the Save/Open tab.
  2. Select the Save AutoRecover info every check box.
  3. In the minutes box, type or select a number to determine how often you want to save files.

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Word

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Word Options.
  2. Click Save.
  3. Select the Save AutoRecover information every check box.
  4. In the minutes box, type or select a number to determine how often you want to save files.

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See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Introduction to new file name extensions and Open XML Formats

Tags  compatibility; extensions; file format; macro; summarize; xlsx; XML

What are tags?

The 2007 Microsoft Office system introduces a new file format that is based on XML. It is called Open XML Formats and applies to Microsoft Office Word 2007, Microsoft Office Excel 2007, and Microsoft Office PowerPoint 2007. This article summarizes key benefits of the new format, describes what the new file name extensions are, and discusses how you can share the 2007 Office release files with people who are using earlier versions of Office.

Dont have the 2007 Office release yet? You can download a free trial or buy it now.

In this article

What are the benefits of Open XML Formats?

What are the new file name extensions?

Can different versions of Office share the same files?

What are the benefits of Open XML Formats?

The Open XML Formats introduces a number of benefits  not only for developers and the solutions that they build, but also for individual people and organizations of all sizes:

  • Compact files   Files are automatically compressed and can be up to 75 percent smaller in some cases. The Open XML Formats uses zip compression technology to store documents, offering potential cost savings as it reduces the disk space required to store files and decreases the bandwidth needed to send files via e-mail, over networks, and across the Internet. When you open a file, it is automatically unzipped. When you save a file, it is automatically zipped again. You do not have to install any special zip utilities to open and close files in the 2007 Office release.
  • Improved damaged-file recovery   Files are structured in a modular fashion that keeps different data components in the file separate from each other. This allows files to be opened even if a component within the file (for example, a chart or table) is damaged or corrupted.
  • Better privacy and more control over personal information   Documents can be shared confidentially, because personally identifiable information and business-sensitive information, such as author names, comments, tracked changes, and file paths can be easily identified and removed by using Document Inspector. For details, see Remove hidden data and personal information from Office documents.
  • Better integration and interoperability of business data   Using Open XML Formats as the data interoperability framework for the 2007 Office release set of products means that documents, worksheets, presentations, and forms can be saved in an XML file format that is freely available for anyone to use and to license, royalty free. Office also supports customer-defined XML Schemas that enhance the existing Office document types. This means that customers can easily unlock information in existing systems and act upon it in familiar Office programs. Information that is created within Office can be easily used by other business applications. All you need to open and edit an Office file is a ZIP utility and an XML editor.
  • Easier detection of documents that contain macros   Files that are saved by using the default "x" suffix (such as .docx, .xlsx, and .pptx) cannot contain Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) macros and XLM macros. Only files whose file name extension ends with an "m" (such as .docm, .xlsm, and .pptm) can contain macros.

 Note    You might sometimes need to save your files in the binary file format that was used in earlier versions of Office. For example, you might be working on a document with someone who has an earlier version of Office. For this reason, the 2007 Office release still allows you to save files in in binary format.

Before you decide to save your file in a binary format, read the Can different versions of Office share the same files? section of this article.

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What are the new file name extensions?

By default, documents, worksheets, and presentations that you create in the 2007 Office release are saved in XML format with new file name extensions that add an "x" or an "m" to the file name extensions that you are already familiar with. The "x" signifies an XML file that has no macros, and the "m" signifies an XML file that does contain macros. For example, when you save a document in Word, the file now uses the .docx file name extension by default, rather than the .doc file name extension.

When you save a file as a template, you see the same sort of change. The template extension used in earlier versions is there, but it now has an "x" or an "m" on the end. If your file contains code or macros, you must save it by using the new macro-enabled XML file format, which adds an "m" for macro to the file extension.

The following tables list all of the default file extensions in Office Word 2007, Office Excel 2007, and Office PowerPoint 2007.

Word

XML file type

Extension

Document

.docx

Macro-enabled document

.docm

Template

.dotx

Macro-enabled template

.dotm

Excel

XML file type

Extension

Workbook

.xlsx

Macro-enabled workbook

.xlsm

Template

.xltx

Macro-enabled template

.xltm

Non-XML binary workbook

.xlsb

Macro-enabled add-in

.xlam

PowerPoint

XML file type

Extension

Presentation

.pptx

Macro-enabled presentation

.pptm

Template

.potx

Macro-enabled template

.potm

Macro-enabled add-in

.ppam

Show

.ppsx

Macro-enabled show

.ppsm

Slide

.sldx

Macro-enabled slide

.sldm

Office theme

.thmx

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Can different versions of Office share the same files?

The 2007 Office release allows you to save files in the new Open XML Formats and in the binary file format of earlier versions of Office. The 2007 Office release includes both compatibility checkers and file converters to facilitate file-sharing between different versions of Office.

Opening existing files in the 2007 Office release   You can open and work on a file that was created in an earlier version of Office, and then save it in its existing format. Because you might be working on a document with someone who uses an earlier version of Office, you don't want to introduce any features supported only by the 2007 Office release. The 2007 Office release uses a compatibility checker that checks to make sure that you have not introduced a feature that an earlier version of Office does not support. When you save the file, the compatibility checker reports those features to you and then allows you to remove them before continuing with the save.

For more information about using the 2007 Office release to open documents, workbooks, and presentations created in earlier versions of Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, see the links in the See Also section.

Opening the 2007 Office release files in earlier versions of Office   You can open and edit a 2007 Office release file in an earlier version of Word, Excel, or PowerPoint by downloading the necessary file converters. On the computer with an earlier version of Office, go to the Download Center and download the Microsoft Office Compatibility Pack for 2007 Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint File Formats.

Important  For the converters to work, your version of Microsoft Office must first be updated to one of the service packs listed here. After you have installed the service pack for your version of Office, then download the converter.

For more information about opening the 2007 Office release documents, workbooks, and presentations in earlier versions of Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, see the links in the See Also section.

Dont have the 2007 Office release yet? You can try it or buy it now.

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See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Organize quick file access by using the My Places bar

You likely have one or more folders where you store files of certain types, and you often need to find or store files in these folders. You can use the My Places bar to quickly go to a folder to save or find a file that you need. The My Places bar is most useful if you customize it. In this article, you will learn how to customize the My Places bar.

In this article

What is the My Places bar?

Add a shortcut to the My Places bar

Remove a shortcut from the My Places bar

Rearrange shortcuts on the My Places bar

Change the size of icons on the My Places bar

What is the My Places bar?

The My Places bar is an area at the left side in some dialog boxes, such as Save As, Open, and Insert Picture. You can use the My Places bar to specify a folder where you want to store your files for easier access. Making changes to the My Places bar in any one dialog box causes the same changes to appear in other dialog boxes that have the My Places bar.

By default, the My Places bar contains shortcuts to the My Recent Documents, Desktop, My Documents, My Computer, and My Network Places folders. You can add up to 256 folders to the My Places bar. You cannot add files to the My Places bar.

To choose a folder, use the Save in list.

To view the contents of a folder on the My Places bar, click the folder's shortcut on the My Places bar.

To see more shortcuts that you added to the My Places bar, click the arrow.

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Add a shortcut to the My Places bar

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Excel

InfoPath

OneNote

Outlook

PowerPoint

Project

Publisher

SharePoint Designer

Visio

Word

Excel

  • Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  • In the Save in list, click the drive, folder, or Internet location for which you want to create a My Places bar shortcut.
  • Right-click a blank space in the My Places bar below the existing shortcuts, and then click Add folder name.
    Your new shortcut appears at the bottom of the My Places bar.

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InfoPath

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. In the Save in list, click the drive, folder, or Internet location for which you want to create a My Places bar shortcut.
  3. Right-click a blank space in the My Places bar below the existing shortcuts, and then click Add folder name.
    Your new shortcut appears at the bottom of the My Places bar.

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OneNote

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. In the Save in list, click the drive, folder, or Internet location for which you want to create a My Places bar shortcut.
  3. Right-click a blank space in the My Places bar below the existing shortcuts, and then click Add folder name.
    Your new shortcut appears at the bottom of the My Places bar.

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Outlook

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. In the Save in list, click the drive, folder, or Internet location for which you want to create a My Places bar shortcut.
  3. Right-click a blank space in the My Places bar below the existing shortcuts, and then click Add folder name.
    Your new shortcut appears at the bottom of the My Places bar.

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PowerPoint

  • Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  • In the Save in list, click the drive, folder, or Internet location for which you want to create a My Places bar shortcut.
  • Right-click a blank space in the My Places bar below the existing shortcuts, and then click Add folder name.
    Your new shortcut appears at the bottom of the My Places bar.

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Project

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. In the Save in list, click the drive, folder, or Internet location for which you want to create a My Places bar shortcut.
  3. Right-click a blank space in the My Places bar below the existing shortcuts, and then click Add folder name.
    Your new shortcut appears at the bottom of the My Places bar.

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Publisher

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. In the Save in list, click the drive, folder, or Internet location for which you want to create a My Places bar shortcut.
  3. Right-click a blank space in the My Places bar below the existing shortcuts, and then click Add folder name.
    Your new shortcut appears at the bottom of the My Places bar.

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SharePoint Designer

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. In the Save in list, click the drive, folder, or Internet location for which you want to create a My Places bar shortcut.
  3. Right-click a blank space in the My Places bar below the existing shortcuts, and then click Add folder name.
    Your new shortcut appears at the bottom of the My Places bar.

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Visio

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. In the Save in list, click the drive, folder, or Internet location for which you want to create a My Places bar shortcut.
  3. Right-click a blank space in the My Places bar below the existing shortcuts, and then click Add folder name.
    Your new shortcut appears at the bottom of the My Places bar.

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Word

  • Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  • In the Save in list, click the drive, folder, or Internet location for which you want to create a My Places bar shortcut.
  • Right-click a blank space in the My Places bar below the existing shortcuts, and then click Add folder name.
    Your new shortcut appears at the bottom of the My Places bar.

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Remove a shortcut from the My Places bar

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Excel

InfoPath

OneNote

Outlook

PowerPoint

Project

Publisher

SharePoint Designer

Visio

Word

Excel

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to remove, and then click Remove on the shortcut menu.

 Note    You can remove only the shortcuts that you added to the My Places bar. You cannot remove the default shortcuts, such as My Documents, unless you edit your Microsoft Windows Registry. Find links to more information about how to remove the default shortcuts in the See also section.

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InfoPath

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to remove, and then click Remove on the shortcut menu.

 Note    You can remove only the shortcuts that you added to the My Places bar. You cannot remove the default shortcuts, such as My Documents, unless you edit your Microsoft Windows Registry. Find links to more information about how to remove the default shortcuts in the See also section.

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OneNote

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to remove, and then click Remove on the shortcut menu.

 Note    You can remove only the shortcuts that you added to the My Places bar. You cannot remove the default shortcuts, such as My Documents, unless you edit your Microsoft Windows Registry. Find links to more information about how to remove the default shortcuts in the See also section.

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Outlook

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to remove, and then click Remove on the shortcut menu.

 Note    You can remove only the shortcuts that you added to the My Places bar. You cannot remove the default shortcuts, such as My Documents, unless you edit your Microsoft Windows Registry. Find links to more information about how to remove the default shortcuts in the See also section.

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PowerPoint

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to remove, and then click Remove on the shortcut menu.

 Note    You can remove only the shortcuts that you added to the My Places bar. You cannot remove the default shortcuts, such as My Documents, unless you edit your Microsoft Windows Registry. Find links to more information about how to remove the default shortcuts in the See also section.

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Project

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to remove, and then click Remove on the shortcut menu.

 Note    You can remove only the shortcuts that you added to the My Places bar. You cannot remove the default shortcuts, such as My Documents, unless you edit your Microsoft Windows Registry. Find links to more information about how to remove the default shortcuts in the See also section.

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Publisher

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to remove, and then click Remove on the shortcut menu.

 Note    You can remove only the shortcuts that you added to the My Places bar. You cannot remove the default shortcuts, such as My Documents, unless you edit your Microsoft Windows Registry. Find links to more information about how to remove the default shortcuts in the See also section.

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SharePoint Designer

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to remove, and then click Remove on the shortcut menu.

 Note    You can remove only the shortcuts that you added to the My Places bar. You cannot remove the default shortcuts, such as My Documents, unless you edit your Microsoft Windows Registry. Find links to more information about how to remove the default shortcuts in the See also section.

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Visio

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to remove, and then click Remove on the shortcut menu.

 Note    You can remove only the shortcuts that you added to the My Places bar. You cannot remove the default shortcuts, such as My Documents, unless you edit your Microsoft Windows Registry. Find links to more information about how to remove the default shortcuts in the See also section.

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Word

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to remove, and then click Remove on the shortcut menu.

 Note    You can remove only the shortcuts that you added to the My Places bar. You cannot remove the default shortcuts, such as My Documents, unless you edit your Microsoft Windows Registry. Find links to more information about how to remove the default shortcuts in the See also section.

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Rearrange shortcuts on the My Places bar

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Excel

InfoPath

OneNote

Outlook

PowerPoint

Project

Publisher

SharePoint Designer

Visio

Word

Excel

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to move, and then click Move Up or Move Down on the shortcut menu.

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InfoPath

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to move, and then click Move Up or Move Down on the shortcut menu.

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OneNote

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to move, and then click Move Up or Move Down on the shortcut menu.

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Outlook

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to move, and then click Move Up or Move Down on the shortcut menu.

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PowerPoint

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to move, and then click Move Up or Move Down on the shortcut menu.

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Project

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to move, and then click Move Up or Move Down on the shortcut menu.

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Publisher

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to move, and then click Move Up or Move Down on the shortcut menu.

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SharePoint Designer

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to move, and then click Move Up or Move Down on the shortcut menu.

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Visio

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to move, and then click Move Up or Move Down on the shortcut menu.

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Word

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  2. On the My Places bar, right-click the shortcut that you want to move, and then click Move Up or Move Down on the shortcut menu.

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Change the size of icons on the My Places bar

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Excel

InfoPath

OneNote

Outlook

PowerPoint

Project

Publisher

SharePoint Designer

Visio

Word

Excel

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  2. Right-click the My Places bar, and then click Small Icons or Large Icons on the shortcut menu.

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InfoPath

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. Right-click the My Places bar, and then click Small Icons or Large Icons on the shortcut menu.

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OneNote

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. Right-click the My Places bar, and then click Small Icons or Large Icons on the shortcut menu.

 Top of Page

Outlook

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. Right-click the My Places bar, and then click Small Icons or Large Icons on the shortcut menu.

 Top of Page

PowerPoint

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  2. Right-click the My Places bar, and then click Small Icons or Large Icons on the shortcut menu.

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Project

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. Right-click the My Places bar, and then click Small Icons or Large Icons on the shortcut menu.

 Top of Page

Publisher

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. Right-click the My Places bar, and then click Small Icons or Large Icons on the shortcut menu.

 Top of Page

SharePoint Designer

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. Right-click the My Places bar, and then click Small Icons or Large Icons on the shortcut menu.

 Top of Page

Visio

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. Right-click the My Places bar, and then click Small Icons or Large Icons on the shortcut menu.

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Word

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  2. Right-click the My Places bar, and then click Small Icons or Large Icons on the shortcut menu.

 Top of Page

 

See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Select multiple files

You can perform an action (such as copying, moving, or deleting) on more than one file at a time, as long as all of the files are located in the same folder. Remember that some tasks, including moving and deleting, can be performed only on files that are not currently open in any program. If the files are shared files, they must also be checked in.

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Access

Excel

InfoPath

OneNote

Outlook

PowerPoint

Project

Publisher

SharePoint Designer

Visio

Word

Access

  • Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  • Do one of the following:
    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

 Note    For more information about moving, deleting, and restoring files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Excel

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Do one of the following:
    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

 Note    For more information about moving, deleting, and restoring files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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InfoPath

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Do one of the following:
    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

 Note    For more information about moving, deleting, and restoring files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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OneNote

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Do one of the following:
    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

 Note    For more information about moving, deleting, and restoring files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Outlook

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Do one of the following:
    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

 Note    For more information about moving, deleting, and restoring files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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PowerPoint

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Do one of the following:
    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

 Note    For more information about moving, deleting, and restoring files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Project

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Do one of the following:
    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

 Note    For more information about moving, deleting, and restoring files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Publisher

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Do one of the following:
    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

 Note    For more information about moving, deleting, and restoring files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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SharePoint Designer

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Do one of the following:
    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

 Note    For more information about moving, deleting, and restoring files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Visio

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Do one of the following:
    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

 Note    For more information about moving, deleting, and restoring files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Word

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Do one of the following:
    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

 Note    For more information about moving, deleting, and restoring files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Close workbooks or workbook windows

When your computer is running a single instance of Excel, all workbooks (workbook: A spreadsheet program file that you create in Excel. A workbook contains worksheets of rows and columns in which you can enter and calculate data.) that you open are opened in a workbook window inside the Excel window. You can also create new workbook windows for any worksheet (worksheet: The primary document that you use in Excel to store and work with data. Also called a spreadsheet. A worksheet consists of cells that are organized into columns and rows; a worksheet is always stored in a workbook.) in a workbook by using the New Window command (View tab, Window group).

For more information, see View two or more worksheets at the same time.

You can close each of these workbook windows one at a time, or you can close the whole workbook (including all of its workbook windows). To close all workbooks that are open, you can close the Excel window or exit Excel.

What do you want to do?

Close the active workbook window

Close a workbook

Close all workbooks and exit Excel

Close the active workbook window

  1. Click the workbook window that you want to close.
  2. In the upper-right corner of the workbook window, click Close Window .

 Note    If the window is the only open window of the workbook, the whole workbook is closed. If there are more workbook windows of the same workbook, only the active workbook window is closed.

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Close a workbook

  1. Activate the workbook that you want to close.
  2. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Close.

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Close all workbooks and exit Excel

Do one of the following:

  • In the upper-right corner of the Excel window, click Close .
  • Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Exit Excel.

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See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Repairing a corrupted workbook

When you open a workbook that has been corrupted, Microsoft Office Excel automatically starts File Recovery mode and attempts to reopen and simultaneously repair the workbook.

Excel cannot always start File Recovery mode automatically. If you cannot open a workbook because it has been corrupted, you can try to repair the workbook manually.

You can also try other methods to recover workbook data when repairing a workbook is not successful. As a preventive measure, you may want to save your workbook often and create a backup copy every time that you save it. Or you can specify that Excel automatically creates a recovery file at specific intervals. This way, you will have access to a good copy of the workbook, if the original is deleted accidentally or if it becomes corrupted.

What do you want to do?

Repair a corrupted workbook manually

Recover data from a corrupted workbook

Automatically save a backup copy of a workbook

Automatically create a recovery file at specific intervals

Repair a corrupted workbook manually

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.
  2. In the Open dialog box, select the corrupted workbook that you want to open.
  3. Click the arrow next to the Open button, and then click Open and Repair.
  4. Do one of the following:
    • To recover as much of the workbook data as possible, click Repair.
    • To extract values and formulas from the workbook when an attempt to repair the workbook is not successful, click Extract Data.

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Recover data from a corrupted workbook

The following methods may help you to salvage data that might otherwise be lost. If one method is not successful, you can try another. You can also try third-party software solutions to try to recover workbook data if you cannot recover your data by using these methods.

Important  If a disk error or network error makes it impossible to open a workbook, move the workbook to a different hard disk drive or from the network to a local disk before you spend time trying any of the following recovery options.

  • To recover data when the workbook is open in Excel, do one of the following:
    • Revert the workbook to the last saved version   If you are editing a worksheet and the workbook becomes corrupted before you save your changes, you can recover the original worksheet by reverting it to the last saved version.

To revert the workbook to the last saved version, do the following:

      1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.
      2. Double-click the name of the workbook that you have open in Excel.
      3. Click Yes to reopen the workbook.

 Note    The workbook reverts to the last saved version of the workbook. Any changes that may have caused the workbook to become corrupted have been discarded.

    • Save the workbook in SYLK (Symbolic Link) format   By saving the workbook in SYLK format, you may be able to filter out the corrupted elements. SYLK format is typically used to remove printer corruption.

To save the workbook in SYLK format, do the following:

      1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then point to the arrow next to Save As.
      2. In the Save as type list, click SYLK (Symbolic Link), and then click Save.

 Note    Only the active sheet in the workbook is saved when you use the SYLK file format.

      1. If a message prompts you that the selected file type does not support workbooks that contain multiple sheets, click OK to save only the active sheet.
      2. If a message prompts you that the workbook may contain features that are not compatible with the SYLK format, click Yes.
      3. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Close.
      4. If a message prompts you to save the changes that you made, click Yes.
      5. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.
      6. Select the .slk file that you saved, and then click Open.

 Note    To see the .slk file, you may need to click All Files or SYLK Files in the Files of type list.

      1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then point to the arrow next to Save As.
      2. In the Save as type box, click Excel Workbook.
      3. In the File name box, type a new name for the workbook to create a copy without replacing the original workbook, and then click Save.

 Note    Because this format saves only the active worksheet in the workbook, you must open the corrupted workbook repeatedly and save each worksheet separately.

  • To recover the data when you cannot open the workbook in Excel, do one of the following:
    • Set the calculation option in Excel to manual   To open a workbook, try changing the calculation setting from automatic to manual. Because the workbook won't be recalculated, it may open.

To set the calculation option in Excel to manual, do the following:

      1. Make sure that a new, blank workbook is open in Excel. If a new, blank workbook is not open, do the following:
        1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click New.
        2. Under New Blank, click Blank document.
      2. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Excel Options.
      3. In the Formulas category, under Calculation options, click Manually.
      4. Click OK.
      5. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.
      6. Select the corrupted workbook, and then click Open.
    • Use external references to link to the corrupted workbook   If you want to retrieve only data and not formulas or values from the workbook, you can use external references to link to the corrupted workbook.

To use external references to link to the corrupted workbook, do the following:

      1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.
      2. In the Look in box, select the folder that contains the corrupted workbook, and then click Cancel.
      3. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click New.
      4. Under New Blank, click Blank document.
      5. In cell A1 of the new workbook, type =File Name!A1, where File Name is the name of the corrupted workbook, and then press ENTER.

Tip  You have to enter only the name of the workbook  you do not have to type the extension.

      1. Click the workbook, and then click OK.
      2. If the Select Sheet dialog box appears, select the appropriate sheet, and then click OK.
      3. Select cell A1.
      4. On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click Copy.

Keyboard shortcut  You can also press CTRL+C.

      1. Select an area that is approximately the same size as the range of cells that contain data in the corrupted workbook.
      2. On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click Paste.

Keyboard shortcut  You can also press CTRL+V.

      1. With the range of cells still selected, on the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click Copy again.

Keyboard shortcut  You can also press CTRL+C.

      1. On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the arrow below Paste, and then click Paste Special.
      2. Under Paste, select Values, and then click OK.

 Note    Pasting values removes the links to the corrupted workbook and leaves only the data.

    • Open the corrupted workbook in Microsoft Office Word or Microsoft WordPad   If you have the Microsoft Office Excel converter installed, you might be able to open the workbook in Word. If the workbook opens in Word, you can recover the data. You cannot use this method to recover module sheets, dialog sheets, chart sheets, macro sheets, or any embedded charts. You won't be able to recover cell formulas either. You can recover only the results of those formulas that are currently displayed in the cells of the corrupted workbook.

You can also open your Excel workbook in WordPad. If the workbook does open, you may be able to recover the Microsoft Visual Basic code in your modules and class modules. You can search for the words "Sub" or "Function" to find your code.

    • Use a macro to extract data from a corrupted workbook   If a chart is linked to the corrupted workbook, you can use a macro to extract the source data of the chart.

To use a macro, do the following:

      1. Enter the following macro code in a module sheet:
      2.  
      3. Sub GetChartValues97()
      4. Dim NumberOfRows As Integer
      5. Dim X As Object
      6. Counter = 2
      7.  
      8. ' Calculate the number of rows of data.
      9. NumberOfRows = UBound(ActiveChart.SeriesCollection(1).Values)
      10.  
      11. Worksheets("ChartData").Cells(1, 1) = "X Values"
      12.  
      13. ' Write x-axis values to worksheet.
      14. With Worksheets("ChartData")
      15. .Range(.Cells(2, 1), _
      16. .Cells(NumberOfRows + 1, 1)) = _
      17. Application.Transpose(ActiveChart.SeriesCollection(1).XValues)
      18. End With
      19.  
      20. ' Loop through all series in the chart and write their values to
      21.  
      22.  
      23. ' the worksheet.
      24. For Each X In ActiveChart.SeriesCollection
      25. Worksheets("ChartData").Cells(1, Counter) = X.Name
      26.  
      27. With Worksheets("ChartData")
      28. .Range(.Cells(2, Counter), _
      29. .Cells(NumberOfRows + 1, Counter)) = _
      30. Application.Transpose(X.Values)
      31. End With
      32.  
      33. Counter = Counter + 1
      34. Next
      35.  
      36. End Sub
      37. Insert a new worksheet into your workbook and rename it ChartData.
      38. Select the chart from which you want to extract the underlying data values.

 Note    The chart can be embedded on a worksheet or on a separate chart sheet.

      1. Run the GetChartValues97 macro.

The data from the chart will be placed on the ChartData worksheet.

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Automatically save a backup copy of a workbook

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then point to the arrow next to Save As.
  2. Click the arrow next to Tools, and then click General Options.
  3. Select the Always create backup check box.

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Automatically create a recovery file at specific intervals

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Excel Options.
  2. In the Save category, under Preserve backup information for your workbooks, select the Save AutoRecover information every check box, and then enter a number of minutes.
  3. In the AutoRecover file location box, enter the location where you want to save the recovery file.
  4. Make sure that the Disable AutoRecover for this workbook only check box is not selected.

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Excel > Workbook management > File management

Save workbooks in an arranged workspace

You can save a snapshot of the current layout of all open and arranged workbook windows in a workspace file (workspace file: A file that saves display information about open workbooks, so that you can later resume work with the same window sizes, print areas, screen magnification, and display settings. A workspace file doesn't contain the workbooks themselves.) (.xlw). When you open a workspace file, Microsoft Office Excel opens all workbooks and displays them in the layout that you saved.

  1. Open the workbooks that you want to save in a workspace.
  2. Arrange the workbook windows as you want them to appear when you open the workspace, changing the size of each workbook window as needed.
  3. On the View tab, in the Window group, click Save Workspace.

  1. In the File name box, type a name for the workspace file.

 Note    The default name is resume.xlw, but you can rename it.

Tip  To open the workbooks that you saved in the workspace file each time that you start Excel, you can save that workspace file in the XLStart folder. Save only the workspace file, not the workbook files, in the XLStart folder. In Windows Vista, the path to the XLStart folder is C:\Users\user name\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Excel\XLStart folder. In Microsoft Windows XP, the path to the XLStart folder is C:\Documents and Settings\user name\Application Data\Microsoft\Excel\XLStart folder.

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Automatically save a backup copy of a workbook

You can use AutoRecover to have Microsoft Office Excel automatically save a backup copy every time that you save a workbook. The backup copy is a copy of the previously saved version of your workbook. As a result, you have the current saved information in the original workbook and all previously saved information in the backup copy. Each time that you save the workbook, a new backup copy replaces the existing backup copy. Saving a backup copy can protect your work if you accidentally save changes that you do not want to keep or delete the original file.

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Excel Options.
  2. In the Save category, under Save workbooks, select the Save AutoRecover information every check box.
  3. In the minutes box, type or select a number to specify the interval for how often you want to save files.

Tip  The more frequently the files are saved, the more information can be recovered if a problem (such as a power failure) occurs while a file is open.

 Note    AutoRecover is not a replacement for regularly saving your files. If you do not save a recovery file after you open it, the file is deleted and any unsaved changes are lost. If you save the recovery file, the recovery file replaces the original file (unless you specify a new file name).

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Save a file in PDF format

Tags  default; file format; file name; files;save; save as; save as template; save document

What are tags?

 Note    You can save as a PDF or XPS file from a 2007 Microsoft Office system program only after you install an add-in. For more information, see Enable support for other file formats, such as PDF and XPS.

You can save files created by many 2007 Microsoft Office system programs in Portable Document Format (PDF), which is a common format for sharing documents.

In this article

Overview of PDF format

Save as PDF format in an Office program

Overview of PDF format

PDF is a fixed-layout electronic file format that preserves document formatting and enables file sharing. The PDF format ensures that when the file is viewed online or printed, it retains exactly the format that you intended, and that data in the file cannot easily be changed. The PDF format is also useful for documents that will be reproduced by using commercial printing methods.

To view a PDF file, you must have a PDF reader installed on your computer. One reader is the Acrobat Reader, available from Adobe Systems.

After you save a file as PDF, you cannot use your 2007 Office release program to make changes directly to the PDF file. You must make changes to the original 2007 Office release file in the 2007 Office release program in which you created it and save the file as PDF again.

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Save as PDF format in an Office program

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Access

Excel

InfoPath

OneNote

PowerPoint

Publisher

Visio

Word

Access

  1. Open the table or report that you want to publish as PDF.
  2. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to the arrow next to Save As, and then click PDF or XPS.
  3. In the File Name list, type or select a name for the file.
  4. In the Save as type list, click PDF.
  5. If you want to open the file immediately after saving it, select the Open file after publishing check box. This check box is available only if you have a PDF reader installed on your computer.
  6. Next to Optimize for, do one of the following, depending on whether file size or print quality is more important to you:
    • If the table or report requires high print quality, click Standard (publishing online and printing).
    • If the print quality is less important than file size, click Minimum size (publishing online).
  7. To specify various options for the file, click Options. (Find links to more information on these options in the See Also section.) Click OK.
  8. In the Publish as PDF or XPS dialog box, click Publish.

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Excel

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to the arrow next to Save As, and then click PDF or XPS.
  2. In the File Name list, type or select a name for the workbook.
  3. In the Save as type list, click PDF.
  4. If you want to open the file immediately after saving it, select the Open file after publishing check box. This check box is available only if you have a PDF reader installed on your computer.
  5. Next to Optimize for, do one of the following, depending on whether file size or print quality is more important to you:
    • If the workbook requires high print quality, click Standard (publishing online and printing).
    • If the print quality is less important than file size, click Minimum size (publishing online).
  6. To specify various options for the file, click Options. (Find links to more information on these options in the See Also section.) Click OK.
  7. Click Publish.

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InfoPath

Do the following when you are filling out a form in Office InfoPath 2007:

  1. On the File menu, point to Export To, and then click PDF or XPS.
  2. In the File Name list, type or select a name for the form.
  3. In the Save as type list, click PDF.
  4. If you want to open the file immediately after saving it, select the Open file after publishing check box. This check box is available only if you have a PDF reader installed on your computer.
  5. Next to Optimize for, do one of the following, depending on whether file size or print quality is more important to you:
    • If the form requires high print quality, click Standard (publishing online and printing).
    • If the print quality is less important than file size, click Minimum size (publishing online).
  6. Click Publish.

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OneNote

  1. On the File menu, click Publish as PDF or XPS.
  2. In the File Name list, type or select a name for the file.
  3. In the Save as type list, click PDF.
  4. Next to Page range, click the option that represents the portion of the notebook that you want to save as PDF.
  5. Click Publish.

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PowerPoint

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to the arrow next to Save As, and then click PDF or XPS.
  2. In the File name list, type or select a name for the presentation.
  3. In the Save as type list, click PDF.
  4. If you want to open the file immediately after saving it, select the Open file after publishing check box. This check box is available only if you have a PDF reader installed on your computer.
  5. Next to Optimize for, do one of the following, depending on whether file size or print quality is more important to you:
    • If the presentation requires high print quality, click Standard (publishing online and printing).
    • If the print quality is less important than file size, click Minimum size (publishing online).
  6. To specify various options for the file, click Options. (Find links to more information on these options in the See Also section.) Click OK.
  7. Click Publish.

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Publisher

Save as PDF for sharing or Web distribution

If you want to share the publication in a fixed format over the Web or a network, do the following:

  1. On the File menu, click Publish as PDF or XPS.
  2. In the File name list, type or select a name for the publication.
  3. In the Save as type list, click PDF.
  4. Next to Optimize for, click Change.
  5. In the Publish Options dialog box, click the optimization in the Specify how this publication will be printed or distributed list that matches the needs of the publication. For example, if the publication will be distributed online and print quality is less important than a small file size, click Minimum size. If the quality of the printing is more important than file size, click High quality printing.
  6. Click Advanced to display the entire dialog box, and select the settings that you need. (Find links to more information on these options in the See Also section.)
  7. Click OK.
  8. In the Save As dialog box, if you want to open the file immediately after saving it, select the Open file after publishing check box. This check box is available only if you have a PDF reader installed on your computer, and if the Commercial Press option is not selected in the Publish Options dialog box.
  9. Click Save.

Save as PDF for commercial printing

If the publication is being sent to a commercial printer, do the following:

  1. On the File menu, point to Pack and Go, and then click Take to a Commercial Printing service.
  2. In the pane at left, in the How will this publication be printed? list, click the option that you want. If you will be using an offset printing service, click Commercial Press. If you will be using a high-end copy shop, click High quality printing.
  3. Click Printing Options.
  4. In the Print Options dialog box, select the options that you need. (Find links to more information on these options in the See Also section.) Click OK.
  5. Under Select an item to fix, repair any problems that Publisher has identified.
  6. Under Export, select the Create a PDF check box.
  7. Click Save.
  8. In the Pack and Go Wizard, select the location to which you want to export the file, and click Next.

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Visio

  1. On the File menu, click Publish as PDF or XPS.
  2. In the File Name list, type or select a name for the drawing.
  3. In the Save as type list, click PDF.
  4. If you want to open the file immediately after saving it, select the Open file after publishing check box. This check box is available only if you have a PDF reader installed on your computer.
  5. Next to Optimize for, do one of the following, depending on whether file size or print quality is more important to you:
    • If the drawing requires high print quality, click Standard (publishing online and printing).
    • If the print quality is less important than file size, click Minimum size (publishing online).
  6. To print only a selection of pages, or to specify other publishing options, click Options, and select the settings that you need. (Find links to more information on these options in the See Also section.) Click OK.
  7. Click Publish.

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Word

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to the arrow next to Save As, and then click PDF or XPS.
  2. In the File Name list, type or select a name for the document.
  3. In the Save as type list, click PDF.
  4. If you want to open the file immediately after saving it, select the Open file after publishing check box. This check box is available only if you have a PDF reader installed on your computer.
  5. Next to Optimize for, do one of the following, depending on whether file size or print quality is more important to you:
    • If the document requires high print quality, click Standard (publishing online and printing).
    • If the print quality is less important than file size, click Minimum size (publishing online).
  6. Click Options to set the page range to be printed, to choose whether markup should be printed, and to select the output options. (Find links to more information on these options in the See Also section.) Click OK.
  7. Click Publish.

 Note    The third-party products discussed in this article are manufactured by vendors independent of Microsoft; Microsoft makes no warranty, implied or otherwise, regarding the performance or reliability of these products.

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See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Save a file in XPS format

 Note    You can save as a PDF or XPS file from a 2007 Microsoft Office system program only after you install an add-in. For more information, see Enable support for other file formats, such as PDF and XPS.

You can save files created by many 2007 Microsoft Office system programs in XML Paper Specification (XPS), which is a format for sharing documents.

In this article

Overview of XPS format

Save as XPS format in an Office program

Overview of XPS format

XML Paper Specification (XPS) is a fixed-layout electronic file format that preserves document formatting and enables file sharing. The XPS format ensures that when the file is viewed online or printed, it retains exactly the format that you intended, and that data in the file cannot be easily changed.

To view a file in XPS format, you need a viewer. You or the recipient of your file can download a free viewer from Downloads on Microsoft Office Online.

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Save as XPS format in an Office program

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Access

Excel

InfoPath

OneNote

Outlook

PowerPoint

Publisher

Visio

Word

Access

  1. Open the table or report that you want to publish as XPS.
  2. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to the arrow next to Save As, and then click PDF or XPS.
  3. In the File Name list, type or select a name for the file.
  4. In the Save as type list, click XPS Document.
  5. Next to Optimize for, do one of the following, depending on whether file size or print quality is more important to you:
    • If the report requires high print quality, click Standard (publishing online and printing).
    • If the print quality is less important than file size, click Minimum size (publishing online).
  6. To specify various options for the file, click Options. (Find links to more information on these options in the See Also section.) Click OK.
  7. In the Publish as PDF or XPS dialog box, click Publish.

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Excel

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to the arrow next to Save As, and then click PDF or XPS.
  2. In the File Name list, type or select a name for the workbook.
  3. In the Save as type list, click XPS Document.
  4. Next to Optimize for, do one of the following, depending on whether file size or print quality is more important to you:
    • If the workbook requires high print quality, click Standard (publishing online and printing).
    • If the print quality is less important than file size, click Minimum size (publishing online).
  5. To specify various options for the file, click Options. (Find links to more information on these options in the See Also section.) Click OK.
  6. Click Publish.

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InfoPath

  1. On the File menu, point to Export To, and then click PDF or XPS.
  2. In the File Name list, type or select a name for the form.
  3. In the Save as type list, click XPS Document.
  4. Next to Optimize for, do one of the following, depending on whether file size or print quality is more important to you:
    • If the form requires high print quality, click Standard (publishing online and printing).
    • If the print quality is less important than file size, click Minimum size (publishing online).
  5. Click Publish.

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OneNote

  1. On the File menu, click Publish as PDF or XPS.
  2. In the File Name list, type or select a name for the XPS file.
  3. In the Save as type list, click XPS Document.
  4. Next to Page range, click the option that represents the portion of the notebook that you want to save as XPS.
  5. Click Publish.

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Outlook

You can preview XPS files in Microsoft Office Outlook running on Microsoft Windows Vista by downloading and installing the Microsoft XML Paper Specification Essentials Pack.

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PowerPoint

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to the arrow next to Save As, and then click PDF or XPS.
  2. In the File name list, type or select a name for the presentation.
  3. In the Save as type list, click XPS Document.
  4. Next to Optimize for, do one of the following, depending on whether file size or print quality is more important to you:
    • If the presentation requires high print quality, click Standard (publishing online and printing).
    • If the print quality is less important than file size, click Minimum size (publishing online).
  5. To specify various options for the file, click Options. (Find links to more information on these options in the See Also section.) Click OK.
  6. Click Publish.

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Publisher

  1. On the File menu, click Publish as PDF or XPS.
  2. In the File name list, type or select a name for the publication.
  3. In the Save as type list, click XPS Document.
  4. Next to Optimize for, click Change.
  5. In the Publish Options dialog box, click the optimization in the Specify how this publication will be printed or distributed list that matches the needs of the publication. For example, if the publication will be distributed online and print quality is less important than a small file size, click Minimum size. If the quality of the printing is more important than file size, click High quality printing.
  6. Click Advanced to display the entire dialog box, and select the options that you want. (Find links to more information on these options in the See Also section.)
  7. Click OK.
  8. Click Save.

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Visio

  1. On the File menu, click Publish as PDF or XPS.
  2. In the File Name list, type or select a name for the drawing.
  3. In the Save as type list, click XPS Document.
  4. Next to Optimize for, do one of the following, depending on whether file size or print quality is more important to you:
    • If the drawing requires high print quality, click Standard (publishing online and printing).
    • If the print quality is less important than file size, click Minimum size (publishing online).
  5. To print only a selection of pages, or to choose other publishing options, click Options, and select the options that you want. (Find links to more information on these options in the See Also section.) Click OK.
  6. Click Publish.

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Word

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to the arrow next to Save As, and then click PDF or XPS.
  2. In the File Name list, type or select a name for the document.
  3. In the Save as type list, click XPS.
  4. Next to Optimize for, do one of the following, depending on whether file size or print quality is more important to you:
    • If the document requires high print quality, click Standard (publishing online and printing).
    • If the print quality is less important than file size, click Minimum size (publishing online).
  5. Click Options to set the page range to be printed, to choose whether markup should be printed, and to select the output options. (Find links to more information on these options in the See Also section.) Click OK.
  6. Click Publish.

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See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Naming files and attachments

File names can be up to 255 characters long, including any file name extension. You can use either uppercase or lowercase letters in file names. File names preserve the case that you use when you create the file name, but the file names are not case sensitive.

Some characters that are available on your keyboard can cause unexpected results if they are used in file names. Do not use these characters when you name files, whether or not you are attaching the file to an e-mail message, cell, or record.

Invalid characters for file names

Character name

 

Question mark

?

Quotation mark

"

Slash or virgule

/

Backslash

\

Less than sign

<

Greater than sign

>

Asterisk

*

Pipe

|

Colon

:

 

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Why do you check to see if my software is genuine when I download a template?

Tags  apply a template; boilerplate; calendar template; chart template; edit; import template; save as; save as template; template

What are tags?

The first time that you download a template, you see a dialog box explaining that this feature is available only to people with genuine Microsoft Office. After we verify that your software is legitimate and fully supported by Microsoft, the template is downloaded, and you never see more messages about genuine software again. Subsequent template downloads just happen immediately.

 Note    We check the validity of the software every time you download a template. However, you won't see the dialog box if you select the Don't show this message again check box or unless we determine that the software isn't genuine.

If you do not have genuine Microsoft Office, another dialog box tells you which Microsoft Office programs that you have installed are not genuine. You also see the list of the nongenuine programs. You can either close the dialog box or click a link to get more information. The link to more information takes you to a Web page on the Microsoft Web site that provides you with additional details about your status and lists the steps to take to make your software legitimate and fully supported. If you do not have genuine Microsoft Office, you cannot download templates.

For more information, see the Genuine Microsoft Software Web site.

 

See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Open a file

Tags  converter; document recovery; files; html; insert Word document; Microsoft Office Button; open and repair; .pdf

What are tags?

When you open a file in Microsoft Office, you have several options for how the file opens. You can open the original file for editing, open a copy, or open the file as read-only, which prevents you from saving the file unless you save it by using another name.

What do you want to do?

Open a file

Open a file as a copy

Open a file as read-only

Open a file

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Important  If you don't see the Microsoft Office Button , click Open on the File menu.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list or Navigation pane, click the folder, drive, removable media (such as flash drive, CD, or DVD), or Internet location that contains the file that you want to open.

 Note    By default, the files that you see in the Open dialog box are only those files that are created by the program that you are using. For example, if you are using Microsoft Office Excel, you do not see files that are created by using Microsoft Office Word unless you click All Files in the Files of type box.

  1. Click the file, and then click Open.

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Open a file as a copy

When you open a file as a copy, the program creates a duplicate of the file, and you look at the duplicate. Any changes that you make are saved to the copy. The program gives the copy a new name. The default is to add Copy (1) of to the beginning of the file name.

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Important  If you don't see the Microsoft Office Button , click Open on the File menu.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list or Navigation pane, click the folder, drive, removable media (such as flash drive, CD, or DVD), or Internet location that contains the file that you want to open.
  2. Click the file that you want to open a copy of.
  3. Click the arrow next to the Open button, and then click Open as Copy.

 Note    When you open a file as a copy, a new copy of the file is created in the folder that contains the original file.

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Open a file as read-only

When you open a file as read-only, you are looking at the original file, but you cannot save changes to it.

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list or Navigation pane, click the folder, drive, removable media (such as flash drive, CD, or DVD), or Internet location that contains the file that you want to open.
  2. Click the file that you want to open as read-only.
  3. Click the arrow next to the Open button, and then click Open Read-Only.

 Notes 

  • Using Microsoft Windows XP, to create a shortcut to a folder on a network file server, Web server, or removable media (such as flash drive, CD, or DVD), use My Network Places on the My Places bar in the Open dialog box.
  • Using Windows Vista, to create a shortcut to a folder on a network file server, Web server, or removable media removable media (such as flash drive, CD, or DVD), use Navigation pane in the Open dialog box.
  • The Recently used files list on the File menu or the Recent Documents list available when you click the Microsoft Office Button displays a list of the last few files that you opened. Click the file name to open the file.
  • The My Recent Documents folder in the Open dialog box lists the previous files and folders that you have opened.

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See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Copy a file

Copying a file creates a duplicate of that file in another place. The other place can be a network location, disk, CD, the desktop, or other storage location. If you are copying files from or to other drives or network locations, you need to identify only the source and target locations in the Look in list. The copying process is the same.

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Access

Excel

InfoPath

OneNote

Outlook

PowerPoint

Project

Publisher

SharePoint Designer

Visio

Word

Access

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that contains the file that you want to copy.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that contains the file that you want to copy.

 Note    By default, the files that you see in the Open dialog box are only those files that are created by the program that you are using. For example, if you are using Microsoft Office Access, you do not see files that are created by using Microsoft Office Word unless you click All Files in the Files of type list.

  1. Right-click the file that you want to copy, and then click Copy on the shortcut menu .

 Note    You can also select more than one file to copy at a time.

How do you select more than one file?

    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that you want to copy the file to.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that you want to copy the file to.
  3. Right-click anywhere in the folder list (make sure your pointer is not resting over a file in the list), and then click Paste on the shortcut menu.

 Note    More information about copying files and folders is available from the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Excel

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that contains the file that you want to copy.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that contains the file that you want to copy.

 Note    By default, the files that you see in the Open dialog box are only those files that are created by the program that you are using. For example, if you are using Microsoft Office Excel, you do not see files that are created by using Microsoft Office Word unless you click All Files in the Files of type list.

  1. Right-click the file that you want to copy, and then click Copy on the shortcut menu .

 Note    You can also select more than one file to copy at a time.

How do you select more than one file?

    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that you want to copy the file to.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that you want to copy the file to.
  3. Right-click anywhere in the folder list (make sure your pointer is not resting over a file in the list), and then click Paste on the shortcut menu.

 Note    More information about copying files and folders is available from the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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InfoPath

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that contains the file that you want to copy.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that contains the file that you want to copy.

 Note    By default, the files that you see in the Open dialog box are only those files that are created by the program that you are using. For example, if you are using Microsoft Office InfoPath, you do not see files that are created by using Microsoft Office Word unless you click All Files in the Files of type list.

  1. Right-click the file that you want to copy, and then click Copy on the shortcut menu .

 Note    You can also select more than one file to copy at a time.

How do you select more than one file?

    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that you want to copy the file to.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that you want to copy the file to.
  3. Right-click anywhere in the folder list (make sure your pointer is not resting over a file in the list), and then click Paste on the shortcut menu.

 Note    More information about copying files and folders is available from the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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OneNote

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that contains the file that you want to copy.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that contains the file that you want to copy.

 Note    By default, the files that you see in the Open dialog box are only those files that are created by the program that you are using. For example, if you are using Microsoft Office OneNote, you do not see files that are created by using Microsoft Office Word unless you click All Files in the Files of type list.

  1. Right-click the file that you want to copy, and then click Copy on the shortcut menu .

 Note    You can also select more than one file to copy at a time.

How do you select more than one file?

    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that you want to copy the file to.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that you want to copy the file to.
  3. Right-click anywhere in the folder list (make sure your pointer is not resting over a file in the list), and then click Paste on the shortcut menu.

 Note    More information about copying files and folders is available from the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Outlook

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that contains the file that you want to copy.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that contains the file that you want to copy.

 Note    By default, the files that you see in the Open dialog box are only those files that are created by the program that you are using. For example, if you are using Microsoft Office Outlook, you do not see files that are created by using Microsoft Office Word unless you click All Files in the Files of type list.

  1. Right-click the file that you want to copy, and then click Copy on the shortcut menu .

 Note    You can also select more than one file to copy at a time.

How do you select more than one file?

    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that you want to copy the file to.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that you want to copy the file to.
  3. Right-click anywhere in the folder list (make sure your pointer is not resting over a file in the list), and then click Paste on the shortcut menu.

 Note    More information about copying files and folders is available from the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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PowerPoint

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that contains the file that you want to copy.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that contains the file that you want to copy.

 Note    By default, the files that you see in the Open dialog box are only those files that are created by the program that you are using. For example, if you are using Microsoft Office PowerPoint, you do not see files that are created by using Microsoft Office Word unless you click All Files in the Files of type list.

  1. Right-click the file that you want to copy, and then click Copy on the shortcut menu .

 Note    You can also select more than one file to copy at a time.

How do you select more than one file?

    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that you want to copy the file to.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that you want to copy the file to.
  3. Right-click anywhere in the folder list (make sure your pointer is not resting over a file in the list), and then click Paste on the shortcut menu.

 Note    More information about copying files and folders is available from the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Project

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that contains the file that you want to copy.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that contains the file that you want to copy.

 Note    By default, the files that you see in the Open dialog box are only those files that are created by the program that you are using. For example, if you are using Microsoft Office Project, you do not see files that are created by using Microsoft Office Word unless you click All Files in the Files of type list.

  1. Right-click the file that you want to copy, and then click Copy on the shortcut menu .

 Note    You can also select more than one file to copy at a time.

How do you select more than one file?

    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that you want to copy the file to.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that you want to copy the file to.
  3. Right-click anywhere in the folder list (make sure your pointer is not resting over a file in the list), and then click Paste on the shortcut menu.

 Note    More information about copying files and folders is available from the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Publisher

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that contains the file that you want to copy.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that contains the file that you want to copy.

 Note    By default, the files that you see in the Open dialog box are only those files that are created by the program that you are using. For example, if you are using Microsoft Office Publisher, you do not see files that are created by using Microsoft Office Word unless you click All Files in the Files of type list.

  1. Right-click the file that you want to copy, and then click Copy on the shortcut menu .

 Note    You can also select more than one file to copy at a time.

How do you select more than one file?

    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that you want to copy the file to.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that you want to copy the file to.
  3. Right-click anywhere in the folder list (make sure your pointer is not resting over a file in the list), and then click Paste on the shortcut menu.

 Note    More information about copying files and folders is available from the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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SharePoint Designer

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that contains the file that you want to copy.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that contains the file that you want to copy.

 Note    By default, the files that you see in the Open dialog box are only those files that are created by the program that you are using. For example, if you are using Microsoft Office SharePoint Designer, you do not see files that are created by using Microsoft Office Word unless you click All Files in the Files of type list.

  1. Right-click the file that you want to copy, and then click Copy on the shortcut menu .

 Note    You can also select more than one file to copy at a time.

How do you select more than one file?

    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that you want to copy the file to.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that you want to copy the file to.
  3. Right-click anywhere in the folder list (make sure your pointer is not resting over a file in the list), and then click Paste on the shortcut menu.

 Note    More information about copying files and folders is available from the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Visio

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that contains the file that you want to copy.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that contains the file that you want to copy.

 Note    By default, the files that you see in the Open dialog box are only those files that are created by the program that you are using. For example, if you are using Microsoft Office Visio, you do not see files that are created by using Microsoft Office Word unless you click All Files in the Files of type list.

  1. Right-click the file that you want to copy, and then click Copy on the shortcut menu .

 Note    You can also select more than one file to copy at a time.

How do you select more than one file?

    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that you want to copy the file to.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that you want to copy the file to.
  3. Right-click anywhere in the folder list (make sure your pointer is not resting over a file in the list), and then click Paste on the shortcut menu.

 Note    More information about copying files and folders is available from the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Word

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that contains the file that you want to copy.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that contains the file that you want to copy.

 Note    By default, the files that you see in the Open dialog box are only those files that are created by the program that you are using. For example, if you are using Microsoft Office Word, you do not see files that are created by using Microsoft Office Excel unless you click All Files in the Files of type list.

  1. Right-click the file that you want to copy, and then click Copy on the shortcut menu .

 Note    You can also select more than one file to copy at a time.

How do you select more than one file?

    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that you want to copy the file to.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that you want to copy the file to.
  3. Right-click anywhere in the folder list (make sure your pointer is not resting over a file in the list), and then click Paste on the shortcut menu.

 Note    More information about copying files and folders is available from the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Excel > Workbook management > File management

Rename a file

Renaming a file changes the file name of an existing file. You cannot rename a file while someone has it open in any program. The file must be closed, and if it is a shared file, it must be checked in. You can save an open file with a new name, but a copy of the file with the original name will still exist.

  1. Do the following in these 2007 Microsoft Office system programs:

Word, Excel, PowerPoint, or Access

    • Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

InfoPath, OneNote, Outlook, Project, Publisher, SharePoint Designer, or Visio

    • On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. In the Look in list, click the folder or drive that contains the file that you want to rename.
  2. In the folder list, locate and open the folder that contains the file that you want to rename.

 Note    By default, the files that you see in the Open dialog box are only those files that are created by the program that you are using. For example, if you are using Microsoft Office Excel, you do not see files that are created by using Microsoft Office Word unless you click All Files in the Files of type box.

  1. Right-click the file that you want to rename, and then click Rename on the shortcut menu (shortcut menu: A menu that shows a list of commands relevant to a particular item. To display a shortcut menu, right-click an item or press SHIFT+F10.).
  2. Type the new name, and then press ENTER.

 Note    For more information about renaming files and folders by using My Computer or Microsoft Windows Explorer, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Move a file

When you move a file, you actually copy it to a new location and delete it from the original location. The new copy might be put on the original disk or network location or on a separate one. In either case, the moving process is the same.

If the Microsoft Office file that you want to move is an HTML page, you must move the HTML file plus its accompanying folder, which contains supporting files, such as images. This requirement does not apply if the Web page is in the single-file Web page format (mhtml). This format stores everything in one file.

You cannot move a file while someone has it open in any program. The file must be closed, and if it is a shared file, it must be checked in.

What do you want to do?

Move a file by using Windows Explorer

Move a file while in an Office program

 Note    If you are looking for information about moving data files used in Microsoft Office Outlook, see Move an Outlook data file from one computer to another.

Move a file by using Windows Explorer

  1. Open Windows Explorer.

 Note    For more information about moving files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

  1. Locate the file that you want to move.
  2. Right-click the file, and then click Cut on the shortcut menu (shortcut menu: A menu that shows a list of commands relevant to a particular item. To display a shortcut menu, right-click an item or press SHIFT+F10.).

How do I select more than one file?

    • To select nonadjacent files, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

  1. Locate the new location for the file that you want to move.
  2. In the new location, right-click anywhere in the folder (make sure that your pointer is not resting on a file in the list), and then click Paste on the shortcut menu.

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Move a file while in an Office program

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Important  If you don't see the Microsoft Office Button , click Open on the File menu.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Locate the file that you want to move.

 Note    By default, the files that you see in the Open dialog box are only those files that are created by the program that you are using. For example, if you are using Microsoft Office Excel, you do not see files that are created by using Microsoft Office Word unless you click All Files in the Files of type box.

  1. Right-click the file, and then click Cut on the shortcut menu (shortcut menu: A menu that shows a list of commands relevant to a particular item. To display a shortcut menu, right-click an item or press SHIFT+F10.).

How do I select more than one file?

    • To select nonadjacent files, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

  1. Locate the new location for the file that you want to move.
  2. In the new location, right-click anywhere in the folder (make sure that your pointer is not resting on a file in the list), and then click Paste on the shortcut menu.

 Note    For more information about moving files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Delete a file

Deleting a file removes that file from the location where it is stored. If the storage location is your hard disk, the file is moved to the Recycle Bin. If the storage location is a disk, CD, or network location, the file is destroyed.

You cannot delete a file while someone has it open in any program. The file must be closed, and if it is a shared file, it must be checked in.

 Note    For more information about deleting and restoring files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

What do you want to do?

Delete a file by using Windows Explorer

Delete a file while in an Office program

Delete a file by using Windows Explorer

  1. Open Windows Explorer.

 Note    For more information about deleting and restoring files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

  1. Locate the file that you want to delete.
  2. Right-click the file, and click Delete on the shortcut menu.

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Delete a file while in an Office program

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Important  If you don't see the Microsoft Office Button , click Open on the File menu.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Locate the file that you want to delete.
  2. Right-click the file, and then click Delete on the shortcut menu (shortcut menu: A menu that shows a list of commands relevant to a particular item. To display a shortcut menu, right-click an item or press SHIFT+F10.).

 Note    You can also select more than one file to be deleted at the same time.

How do you select more than one file?

    • To select nonadjacent files in the Open dialog box, click one file, hold down CTRL, and then click each additional file.
    • To select adjacent files in the Open dialog box, click the first file in the sequence, hold down SHIFT, and then click the last file.

Tip  If you select a file that you don't want, hold down CTRL, and then click the file again.

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See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

View or change the properties for an Office document

This article explains what document properties are, how you can view or change the properties for a Microsoft Office document, and how you can create custom properties for a document.

What do you want to do?

Learn more about the document properties

View the properties for the current document

View the document properties when you open or save a file

Change the properties for the current document

Create custom properties for a document

Learn more about the document properties

Document properties, also known as metadata (metadata: Data that describes other data. For example, the words in a document are data; the word count is an example of metadata.), are details about a file that describe or identify it. Document properties include details such as title, author name, subject, and keywords that identify the document's topic or contents.

If you specify the relevant values for the document properties fields for your documents, you can easily organize and identify your documents later. You can also search for documents based on their properties. In Microsoft Office Word 2007, Microsoft Office Excel 2007, and Microsoft Office PowerPoint 2007, you can view or edit document properties easily while you work on your document content by using the Document Information Panel, which displays at the top of your document in your Office program.

Types of document properties

There are five types of document properties:

  • Standard properties   By default, Microsoft Office documents are associated with a set of standard properties, such as author, title, and subject. You can specify your own text values for these properties to make it easier to organize and identify your documents. For example, in Word, you can use the Keywords property to add the keyword customers to your sales files. You can search for all sales files with that keyword.
  • Automatically updated properties   These properties include both file system properties (for example, file size or the dates when a file was created or last changed) and statistics that are maintained for you by Office programs (for example, the number of words or characters in a document). You cannot specify or change the automatically updated properties.

You can use the automatically updated properties to identify or find documents. For example, you can search for all files created after August 3, 2005, or for all files that were last changed yesterday.

  • Custom properties   You can define additional custom properties for your Office documents. You can assign a text, time, or numeric value to custom properties, and you can also assign them the values yes or no. You can choose from a list of suggested names or define your own.
  • Properties for your organization   If your organization customized the Document Information Panel, the document properties that are associated with your document may be specific to your organization.
  • Document library properties   These are properties that are associated with documents in a document library (document library: A folder where a collection of files is shared and the files often use the same template. Each file in a library is associated with user-defined information that is displayed in the content listing for that library.) on a Web site or in a public folder. When you create a new document library, you can define one or more document library properties and set rules on their values. When people add documents to the document library, they are prompted to specify the values for each of these properties. For example, a document library that collects product ideas can prompt the person for properties such as Submitted By, Date, Category, and Description. When you open a document from a document library in Office Word 2007, Office Excel 2007, or Office PowerPoint 2007, you can edit and update these document library properties in the Document Information Panel.

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View the properties for the current document

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Access

Excel

PowerPoint

Publisher

Word

Access

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to Manage, and then click Database Properties.
  2. In the File name Properties dialog box, click the tabs to select the properties that you want to view.

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Excel

Use the Document Information Panel to view or change the document properties.

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to Prepare, and then click Properties.
  2. In the Document Information Panel, click the arrow next to Document Properties to select the set of properties that you want to view (for example, Advanced Properties).

 Notes 

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PowerPoint

Use the Document Information Panel to view or change the document properties.

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to Prepare, and then click Properties.
  2. In the Document Information Panel, click the arrow next to Document Properties to select the set of properties that you want to view (for example, Advanced Properties).

 Notes 

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Publisher

  1. On the File menu, click Properties.
  2. In the Publication Properties dialog box, click the tabs to select the properties that you want to view.

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Word

Use the Document Information Panel to view or change the document properties.

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to Prepare, and then click Properties.
  2. In the Document Information Panel, click the arrow next to Document Properties to select the set of properties that you want to view (for example, Advanced Properties).

 Notes 

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View the document properties when you open or save a file

You can view the document properties for a file in the Open dialog box or Save As dialog box.

  1. In the Open dialog box or Save As dialog box, select the document for which you want to view properties.
  2. Click the arrow next to Views, and then do one of the following:
    • To view properties such as the size of the file and the date when the file was last changed, click Details.
    • To view all document properties, click Properties.

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Change the properties for the current document

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Access

Excel

PowerPoint

Publisher

Word

Access

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to Manage, and then click Database Properties.
  2. In the File name Properties dialog box, on the Summary tab, type the values for standard properties, such as Title and Author.

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Excel

Use the Document Information Panel to view or change the document properties.

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to Prepare, and then click Properties.
  2. In the Document Information Panel, click the arrow next to Document Properties to select the set of properties that you want to change, for example, Advanced Properties.

 Note    If your organization customized the Document Information Panel, or if the document for which you want to change properties is saved to a document library (document library: A folder where a collection of files is shared and the files often use the same template. Each file in a library is associated with user-defined information that is displayed in the content listing for that library.) or a document management server, additional document property views may be available.

  1. In the Document Information Panel, type the information that you want in each of the property field boxes.

 Note    Any property fields that are marked by a red asterisk are required fields, and you may need to complete them before you can save your document.

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PowerPoint

Use the Document Information Panel to view or change the document properties.

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to Prepare, and then click Properties.
  2. In the Document Information Panel, click the arrow next to Document Properties to select the set of properties that you want to change, for example, Advanced Properties.

 Note    If your organization customized the Document Information Panel, or if the document for which you want to change properties is saved to a document library (document library: A folder where a collection of files is shared and the files often use the same template. Each file in a library is associated with user-defined information that is displayed in the content listing for that library.) or a document management server, additional document property views may be available.

  1. In the Document Information Panel, type the information that you want in each of the property field boxes.

 Note    Any property fields that are marked by a red asterisk are required fields, and you may need to complete them before you can save your document.

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Publisher

  1. On the File menu, click Properties.
  2. In the Publication Properties dialog box, on the Summary tab, type the values for standard properties, such as Title and Author.

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Word

Use the Document Information Panel to view or change the document properties.

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to Prepare, and then click Properties.
  2. In the Document Information Panel, click the arrow next to Document Properties to select the set of properties that you want to change, for example, Advanced Properties.

 Note    If your organization customized the Document Information Panel, or if the document for which you want to change properties is saved to a document library (document library: A folder where a collection of files is shared and the files often use the same template. Each file in a library is associated with user-defined information that is displayed in the content listing for that library.) or a document management server, additional document property views may be available.

  1. In the Document Information Panel, type the information that you want in each of the property field boxes.

 Note    Any property fields that are marked by a red asterisk are required fields, and you may need to complete them before you can save your document.

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Create custom properties for a document

Custom properties are properties that you define for an Office document. You can assign a text, time, or numeric value to custom properties, and you can also assign them the values yes or no. You can choose from a list of suggested names or define your own.

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Access

Excel

PowerPoint

Publisher

Word

Access

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to Manage, and then click Database Properties.
  2. Click the Custom tab.
  3. In the Name box, type a name for the custom property, or select a name from the list.
  4. In the Type list, select the data type for the property that you want to add.
  5. In the Value box, type a value for the property. The value that you type must match the selection in the Type list. For example, if you select Number in the Type list, you must type a number in the Value box. Values that don't match the property type are stored as text.
  6. Click Add.

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Excel

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to Prepare, and then click Properties.
  2. In the Document Information Panel, click the arrow next to Document Properties, and then click Advanced Properties.
  3. In the Document Properties dialog box, click the Custom tab.
  4. In the Name box, type a name for the custom property, or select a name from the list.
  5. In the Type list, select the data type for the property that you want to add.
  6. In the Value box, type a value for the property. The value that you type must match the selection in the Type list. For example, if you select Number in the Type list, you must type a number in the Value box. Values that don't match the property type are stored as text.
  7. Click Add.

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PowerPoint

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to Prepare, and then click Properties.
  2. In the Document Information Panel, click the arrow next to Document Properties, and then click Advanced Properties.
  3. In the Document Properties dialog box, click the Custom tab.
  4. In the Name box, type a name for the custom property, or select a name from the list.
  5. In the Type list, select the data type for the property that you want to add.
  6. In the Value box, type a value for the property. The value that you type must match the selection in the Type list. For example, if you select Number in the Type list, you must type a number in the Value box. Values that don't match the property type are stored as text.
  7. Click Add.

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Publisher

  1. On the File menu, click Properties.
  2. Click the Custom tab.
  3. In the Name box, type a name for the custom property, or select a name from the list.
  4. In the Type list, select the data type for the property that you want to add.
  5. In the Value box, type a value for the property. The value that you type must match the selection in the Type list. For example, if you select Number in the Type list, you must type a number in the Value box. Values that don't match the property type are stored as text.
  6. Click Add.

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Word

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , point to Prepare, and then click Properties.
  2. In the Document Information Panel, click the arrow next to Document Properties, and then click Advanced Properties.
  3. In the Document Properties dialog box, click the Custom tab.
  4. In the Name box, type a name for the custom property, or select a name from the list.
  5. In the Type list, select the data type for the property that you want to add.
  6. In the Value box, type a value for the property. The value that you type must match the selection in the Type list. For example, if you select Number in the Type list, you must type a number in the Value box. Values that don't match the property type are stored as text.
  7. Click Add.

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See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Create a connection to a shared network folder

If you frequently access a shared network folder, you can use the Map Network Wizard to create a connection to that folder and to assign a drive letter (for example, Y: or Z:) to the connection. After the connection is mapped, you can quickly access the folder whenever you want to.

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Access

Excel

InfoPath

OneNote

Outlook

PowerPoint

Project

Publisher

SharePoint Designer

Visio

Word

Access

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Click Tools, and then click Map Network Drive.
  2. In the Map Network Drive Wizard, in the Drive list, click the drive letter that you want.
  3. In the Folder list, browse to and select the folder that you want to connect to.

To automatically connect to this network drive each time that you start Microsoft Windows, select the Reconnect at logon check box.

  1. Click Finish.

 Note    For more information about managing files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Excel

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Click Tools, and then click Map Network Drive.
  2. In the Map Network Drive Wizard, in the Drive list, click the drive letter that you want.
  3. In the Folder list, browse to and select the folder that you want to connect to.

To automatically connect to this network drive each time that you start Microsoft Windows, select the Reconnect at logon check box.

  1. Click Finish.

 Note    For more information about managing files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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InfoPath

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Click Tools, and then click Map Network Drive.
  2. In the Map Network Drive Wizard, in the Drive list, click the drive letter that you want.
  3. In the Folder list, browse to and select the folder that you want to connect to.

To automatically connect to this network drive each time that you start Microsoft Windows, select the Reconnect at logon check box.

  1. Click Finish.

 Note    For more information about managing files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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OneNote

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Click Tools, and then click Map Network Drive.
  2. In the Map Network Drive Wizard, in the Drive list, click the drive letter that you want.
  3. In the Folder list, browse to and select the folder that you want to connect to.

To automatically connect to this network drive each time that you start Microsoft Windows, select the Reconnect at logon check box.

  1. Click Finish.

 Note    For more information about managing files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Outlook

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Click Tools, and then click Map Network Drive.
  2. In the Map Network Drive Wizard, in the Drive list, click the drive letter that you want.
  3. In the Folder list, browse to and select the folder that you want to connect to.

To automatically connect to this network drive each time that you start Microsoft Windows, select the Reconnect at logon check box.

  1. Click Finish.

 Note    For more information about managing files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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PowerPoint

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Click Tools, and then click Map Network Drive.
  2. In the Map Network Drive Wizard, in the Drive list, click the drive letter that you want.
  3. In the Folder list, browse to and select the folder that you want to connect to.

To automatically connect to this network drive each time that you start Microsoft Windows, select the Reconnect at logon check box.

  1. Click Finish.

 Note    For more information about managing files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Project

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Click Tools, and then click Map Network Drive.
  2. In the Map Network Drive Wizard, in the Drive list, click the drive letter that you want.
  3. In the Folder list, browse to and select the folder that you want to connect to.

To automatically connect to this network drive each time that you start Microsoft Windows, select the Reconnect at logon check box.

  1. Click Finish.

 Note    For more information about managing files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Publisher

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Click Tools, and then click Map Network Drive.
  2. In the Map Network Drive Wizard, in the Drive list, click the drive letter that you want.
  3. In the Folder list, browse to and select the folder that you want to connect to.

To automatically connect to this network drive each time that you start Microsoft Windows, select the Reconnect at logon check box.

  1. Click Finish.

 Note    For more information about managing files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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SharePoint Designer

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Click Tools, and then click Map Network Drive.
  2. In the Map Network Drive Wizard, in the Drive list, click the drive letter that you want.
  3. In the Folder list, browse to and select the folder that you want to connect to.

To automatically connect to this network drive each time that you start Microsoft Windows, select the Reconnect at logon check box.

  1. Click Finish.

 Note    For more information about managing files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Visio

  1. On the File menu, click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Click Tools, and then click Map Network Drive.
  2. In the Map Network Drive Wizard, in the Drive list, click the drive letter that you want.
  3. In the Folder list, browse to and select the folder that you want to connect to.

To automatically connect to this network drive each time that you start Microsoft Windows, select the Reconnect at logon check box.

  1. Click Finish.

 Note    For more information about managing files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Word

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Open.

Keyboard shortcut  To display the Open dialog box, press CTRL+O.

  1. Click Tools, and then click Map Network Drive.
  2. In the Map Network Drive Wizard, in the Drive list, click the drive letter that you want.
  3. In the Folder list, browse to and select the folder that you want to connect to.

To automatically connect to this network drive each time that you start Microsoft Windows, select the Reconnect at logon check box.

  1. Click Finish.

 Note    For more information about managing files and folders, see the Microsoft Windows Help and Support Center, which you can access by clicking Help and Support on the Start menu.

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Excel > Workbook management > File management

Set or rename a default working folder

The My Documents folder, which is located by default in the root directory (root folder: The folder on a drive from which all other folders branch. The root folder's name consists of a single backslash character (\). For example, on drive C, this folder would be represented in the file system as C:\.) of drive C, is the default working folder for all of the documents and other files that you create in your Microsoft Office programs. You can change the name of the My Documents folder, and you can also choose a different default working folder.

What do you want to do?

Change the name of the My Documents folder

Set a different default working folder

Change the name of the My Documents folder

  1. Do the following in these 2007 Microsoft Office system programs:

Word, Excel, PowerPoint, or Access

    • Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.

InfoPath, Project, Publisher, or Visio

    • On the File menu, click Save As.
  1. In the Save in list, click My Documents.
  2. Click Up One Level   .
  3. In the folders list, right-click the My Documents folder, and then click Rename on the shortcut menu (shortcut menu: A menu that shows a list of commands relevant to a particular item. To display a shortcut menu, right-click an item or press SHIFT+F10.).
  4. Type a new folder name, and then press ENTER.

 Note    You may need to close the Save As dialog box and open it again before the change is visible in the My Places bar and the Save in list.

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Set a different default working folder

Do the following in these 2007 Microsoft Office system programs:

 Note    The folder that you select applies only to the program that you are currently using. For example, if you change the default working folder for Word, the default working folder for PowerPoint will still be My Documents.

Access

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Access Options.
  2. Click Popular.
  3. Under Creating databases, in the Default database folder box, type the path of the folder where you want to store Access database files.

Excel

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Excel Options.
  2. Click Save.
  3. Under Save workbooks, type the path in the Default file location box.

PowerPoint

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click PowerPoint Options.
  2. Click Save.
  3. Under Save presentations, type the path in the Default file location box.

Word

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Word Options.
  2. Click Save.
  3. Under Save documents, next to the Default file location box, click Browse.
  4. Browse to the new default working folder, and then click OK.

Project

  1. On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the Save tab.
  2. In the File types list, double-click Projects.
  3. Browse to the new default working folder, and double-click the folder.

If you want to create a new working folder, click Create New Folder   , and then in the New Folder dialog box, in the Name box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.

  1. In the Modify Location dialog box, click OK.

Visio

  1. On the Tools menu, click Options.
  2. On the Advanced tab, click File Paths.
  3. For each file type that you want to set a default folder for, click the appropriate Browse   button, and then browse to the folder where you want to store that file type. You can have separate storage folders for each of the following types of files:
    • My Shapes
    • Drawings
    • Templates
    • Stencils
    • Help
    • Add-ons
    • Start-up
  4. Click OK twice.

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See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Create a new folder

Folders help you to group and organize documents and to find specific documents quickly. You can create a new folder either when you are saving a file, or by using My Computer or Microsoft Windows Explorer.

Create a new folder when you are saving a file

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Access

Excel

InfoPath

OneNote

Outlook

PowerPoint

Project

Publisher

SharePoint Designer

Visio

Word

Access

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  2. In the Save in box, select the folder in which you want to create the new folder.
  3. Click Create New Folder .
  4. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.
  5. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.

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Excel

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  2. In the Save in box, select the folder in which you want to create the new folder.
  3. Click Create New Folder .
  4. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.
  5. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.

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InfoPath

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. In the Save in box, select the folder in which you want to create the new folder.
  3. Click Create New Folder .
  4. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.

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OneNote

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. In the Save in box, select the folder in which you want to create the new folder.
  3. Click Create New Folder .
  4. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.

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Outlook

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. In the Save in box, select the folder in which you want to create the new folder.
  3. Click Create New Folder .
  4. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.

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PowerPoint

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  2. In the Save in box, select the folder in which you want to create the new folder.
  3. Click Create New Folder .
  4. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.
  5. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.

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Project

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. In the Save in box, select the folder in which you want to create the new folder.
  3. Click Create New Folder .
  4. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.

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Publisher

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. In the Save in box, select the folder in which you want to create the new folder.
  3. Click Create New Folder .
  4. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.

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SharePoint Designer

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. In the Save in box, select the folder in which you want to create the new folder.
  3. Click Create New Folder .
  4. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.

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Visio

  1. On the File menu, click Save As.
  2. In the Save in box, select the folder in which you want to create the new folder.
  3. Click Create New Folder .
  4. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.

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Word

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  2. In the Save in box, select the folder in which you want to create the new folder.
  3. Click Create New Folder .
  4. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.
  5. In the New Folder dialog box, type a name for the new folder, and then click OK.

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Create a new folder by using My Computer or Windows Explorer

  1. In My Computer or Windows Explorer, navigate to the folder in which you want to create the new folder.
  2. On the File menu, point to New, and then click Folder.
  3. Type a name for the folder, and press ENTER.

 

See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > File management

Customize the list of recently used files

Many Microsoft Office programs display the last few files you opened in that program. You can use the links on this list to quickly access files. This feature is turned on by default, but you can turn it off, turn it back on, or adjust the number of files that it displays.

If you close a file and then move it to another location, such as by using Windows Explorer, the link to that file in the program in which you created it no longer works. You must use the Open dialog box to browse to the file to open it.

If this feature was turned off and you subsequently turn it back on, only files that you open and save after you turn it on are listed.

Which 2007 Microsoft Office system program are you using?

Access

Excel

InfoPath

PowerPoint

Visio

Word

Access

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Access Options.
  2. Click Advanced.
  3. Under Display, in the Show this number of Recent Documents list, click the number of files that you want to display. If you do not want to display any files, click 0.

Tip  To keep a file in the Recent Documents list, click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Pin this document to the Recent Documents list . When a document is pinned to the Recent Documents list, the pin button looks like a push pin viewed from the top: .

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Excel

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Excel Options.
  2. Click Advanced.
  3. Under Display, in the Show this number of Recent Documents list, click the number of files that you want to display. If you do not want to display any files, click 0.

Tip  To keep a file in the Recent Documents list, click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Pin this document to the Recent Documents list . When a document is pinned to the Recent Documents list, the pin button looks like a push pin viewed from the top: .

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InfoPath

  1. On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the General tab.
  2. Select or clear the Recently used file list check box.
  3. If you want to show your recently used files, in the Entries list, click the number of files that you want to display. If you do not want to display any files and the Recently used file list check box is selected, click 0.

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PowerPoint

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click PowerPoint Options.
  2. Click Advanced.
  3. Under Display, in the Show this number of Recent Documents list, click the number of files that you want to display. If you do not want to display any files, click 0.

Tip  To keep a file in the Recent Documents list, click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Pin this document to the Recent Documents list . When a document is pinned to the Recent Documents list, the pin button looks like a push pin viewed from the top: .

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Visio

  1. On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the General tab.
  2. In the Recently used file list, click the number of files that you want to display. If you do not want to display any files, click 0.

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Word

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Word Options.
  2. Click Advanced.
  3. Under Display, in the Show this number of Recent Documents list, click the number of files that you want to display. If you do not want to display any files, click 0.

Tip  To keep a file in the Recent Documents list, click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Pin this document to the Recent Documents list . When a document is pinned to the Recent Documents list, the pin button looks like a push pin viewed from the top: .

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Excel > Workbook management > File management

Go back to the previous folder, drive, or Internet location

Sometimes, when you are working in either the Open dialog box or the Save As dialog box in a Microsoft Office program, you may want to go back to the previously selected location. You can do this by clicking Back    .

Tip  The name of the previous folder, drive, or Internet location appears in the ScreenTip (ScreenTip: A short description that appears when the user holds the mouse pointer over an object, such as a button or hyperlink.) when you rest the pointer on the Back button.

 

See Also

 

 

Excel > Workbook management > Templates and forms

Create and use an Excel template

Show All

To save time or to promote standardization, you can save a workbook as a template (template: A workbook that you create and use as the basis for other similar workbooks. You can create templates for workbooks and worksheets. The default template for workbooks is called Book.xlt. The default template for worksheets is called Sheet.xlt.) that you can use to create other workbooks. In Microsoft Office Excel 2007, a template file (.xltx) can include data and formatting, and a macro-enabled template file (.xltm) can also include macros (macro: An action or a set of actions that you can use to automate tasks. Macros are recorded in the Visual Basic for Applications programming language.).

You can use one of your own templates to create a new workbook, or you can use one of the many predefined templates that you can download from Microsoft Office Online.

What do you want to do?

Create a template

Use a template to create a new workbook

Create a template

  1. Open the workbook that you want to use as a template.
  2. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click Save As.
  3. In the File name box, type the name that you want to use for the template.
  4. In the Save as type box, click Excel Template, or click Excel Macro-Enabled Template if the workbook contains macros that you want to make available in the template.
  5. Click Save.

The template is automatically placed in the Templates folder to ensure that it will be available when you want to use it to create a new workbook.

Tip  You can copy any Excel workbook into the Templates folder, then you can use the workbook as a template without saving it in the template file format (.xltx or .xltm). In Windows Vista, the Templates folder is usually C:\Users\\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Templates. In Microsoft Windows XP, the Templates folder is usually C:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data\Microsoft\Templates.

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Use a template to create a new workbook

  1. Click the Microsoft Office Button , and then click New.
  2. Under Templates, do one of the following:
    • To base the workbook on a recently used template, click Blank and recent, and then under Recently Used Templates, double-click the template that you want to use.
    • To base the workbook on an installed template, click Installed Templates, and then under Installed Templates, double-click the template that you want to use.
    • To base the workbook on a template that you created, click My templates, and then on the My Templates tab, double-click the template that you want to use.
    • To base the workbook on another workbook, click New from Existing, and then double-click the workbook that you want to use.

Tip  When you are connected to the Internet, you can also access templates that are available from Office Online. Under Microsoft Office Online, click a template category, and then under that category, double-click the template that you want to download. If the template that you want to download has been supplied by a member of the Microsoft Office Online Community, you must click I accept to accept the License Agreement for Community Templates Terms of Use before you can download that template.

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See Also

 

                  

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